"I want a glass of water."

Translation:Tá gloine uisce uaim.

January 14, 2015

14 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamckillip48

How would you say 'I want a water glass?'

January 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

One alternative would be to ask for an uisceghloine: Tá uisceghloine uaim.

January 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/medieval-monk

Is "uisceghloine" a single word for "water glass"?

January 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

Yes.

February 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It appears that uisceghloine has only the “sodium silicate” meaning of “water glass”, not the “drinking vessel for water” meaning.

August 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

You’d use the same sentence. They’re two different uses of the same genitive form, so ambiguity is possible without context.

January 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

I think could say 'tá gloine le haghaidh uisce uaim' to avoid the ambiguity, i.e. 'I want a glass for water', if, for example, you had been given only a wine glass.

January 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

I tried to use the genitive article: "Tá gloine na uisce uaim." IF uisce is indeed considered genitive in this sentence, why is it wrong to use "na"? Maybe I'm doing this too early in the morning, but I can't get my head around it right now.

February 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

There is no definite article in the English sentence, and you would not need one in Irish either.

February 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

Oh, that makes sense. So you can use genitive without the article. That was probably seen in the genitive lesson, but I forgot.

February 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

Your sentence would translate as "I want the glass of the water"; the meaning is different.

February 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mary614996

why do I not need to translate "of" in the part "of water"?

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1216

Because it is an inherent part of a genitive construction - or, if you prefer, English uses "of" to mark the genitive, and Irish uses the tuiseal ginideach.

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua807325

Annoying, I selected "Tá cupán uisce uaim" and it marked it wrong, obviously. I see the difference but it's just annoying.

January 15, 2018
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.