"I cannot buy new clothes."

Translation:Ní féidir liom éadaí nua a cheannach.

3 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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The 'a' with a fada in an earlier construction meant 'at its'. What does this 'a' without a fada literally mean?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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This a is a preposition that literally means “to”, in the English infinitive particle sense of ”to buy”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cesar.gera
cesar.gera
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Is placing the "a cheannach" after "ni feidir lion" never allowed? As in: "ní féidir liom a cheannach éadaí nua"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

No - the "infinitive with an object" construction is always object + a + Verbal-Noun.

What you were trying to get to was probably something like Ní féidir liom ceannaigh éadaí nua, but that that's not how this type of sentence is constructed in Irish, even though in English you can switch between a non-infinitive construction ("I can't buy clothes") or an infinitive construction ("I'm not able to buy clothes" or "It's not possible for me to buy clothes"), you need to stick with the infinitive construction in Irish (with the object before the verbal noun).

1 year ago
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