" mór dom íoc as na bróga sin."

Translation:I have to pay for those shoes.

January 15, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeargalMcGovern

"Ni mor dom" literally means "it is not big for me to". as it is colloquial, is it kind of like a shortened way of saying, "It is not a big deal for me to (do the given task) so I will do it"?

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thecodzwal

So then it's like Americans saying "No biggie"?

February 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1221

No, ní mór means "it is necessary" or "must". The similarity with "no biggie" is a coincidence, as that doesn't mean the same thing.

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bredacm

I cannot understand any of these verbal sentences - why don't they repeat them - as there's no written help. Especially as the word "ioc" is just being introduced, or did I miss it along the way? also another new word in the previous sentence.. Some written exercises with these new words would be helpful.

November 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

What does ni mor dom literally mean?

January 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It's best honestly to think of it as "It is necessary for me". Ní mór do + prep means "it is necessary for + ". It's colloquial.

January 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

OK.

January 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackmchugh12

what dialect would it be used in mostly? (since it's colloquial)

August 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Not sure. Probably all of them.

August 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Feith9

Along the lines of "I must" is "I am restricted to" as in "no matter whatever else I may want or intend to do, I still must do this" And so that 'constriction' of arbitrary options also logically explains "Ni mor dom" imo

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cody.perk

Can "tá ar +" be used in the same way as "ní mór do +"?

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cody.perk

And is "is gá do +" interchangeable with them as well?

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yes. As can caith at timws (caithfidh mé imeacht)

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deserttitan

This will be confusing. As I would think it would be the opposite. So, does "Tá mór dom" mean "I don't have to"?

September 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

ní mór dom is literally "not big to me" - so (very) roughly analogous to "not a big deal", but stronger in meaning. Hopefully that should make it clearer.

Not sure about tá mór dom, but I've never seen it and I can't seem to find any examples. You can say "I must" with the future tense of caith - caithfidh mé..., so maybe you could try ní chaithfidh mé... https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/caith#Irish

October 4, 2015
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