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  5. "Ich mag diesen Schmuck."

"Ich mag diesen Schmuck."

Translation:I like this jewelry.

January 15, 2015

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CiarnOConn

Why is it not das schmuck for this/that jewelry? Can't wrap my head around it, guessing it's very obvious??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

The accusative of "der Schmuck" is "den Schmuck".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaSchildberg

I've understood o far that one uses "das" meaning all of "this/that/these/those" when it refers to some object or thing not yet specified, like "this is cool" or "those are bad".

Let me try better: I'll call this "yet not specified object" YNSO, may I?

First, in the nominative case:

If you wanted to say "this is good jewelry", you would use "das" because you mean something like: - "YNSO" is good jewelry (look: in this case, "good jewelry" is -> qualifying <- the YNSO, by means of the verb 'to be'. Note the relation to the sentences "this is mine" or "that is great!", which do not specify what is "mine", or "great".

Another situation is if you wanted to say "This jewelry is good". In this case, you would be using the word "this" to SPECIFY which jewelry you're talking about, and then in german you wouldn't use "das" anymore, but dieser/dieses/diese (depending on the noun's gender):

  • "dieser Schmuck ist gut" ("dieser" for masculine nouns)
  • "dieses Mädchen ist gut" ("dieses" or abbreviated "dies" for neuter)
  • "diese Frau ist gut" ("diese" for feminine nouns)
  • "diese Bäume sind gut" ("diese" also for plural)

But...that's still not our sentence. In the sentence we're discussing: "I like this jewelry", "jewelry" is in the accusative case (when something is being acted on: in our case, liked) , and there is luckly only one change:

  • "dieser" becomes "diesen"

Take a look at this wikipedia table (the first two lines) of the demonstrative pronouns https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_pronouns#Demonstrative_pronouns

Hope that helps!

Níkolas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanammahjoob

What is dative and genitiv in german . Plz help


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    That's a question that requires more than one comment to answer. Keep learning with Duolingo, reading the comments and bookmarking helpful websites.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tinkerbees6

    I put "I like this jewelry" and it still marks me wrong...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      It has been corrected (Nov 2015).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sergiolin

      what about piece of jewelry? could fit into this meaning?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sahar365657

      Why its mag , not Mage ??


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaSchildberg

      Because mögen is not a regular verb. In the lesson where you learned this verb, check the conjugation:

      ich mag, du magst, er mag, wir mögen, ihr mögt, sie mögen.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablomadd

      Why not 'your jewelry'?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaSchildberg

      Because "diesen" is the accusative case declination of the word "dieser", wich in turn is translated as "this" or "that". (Look my long answer to "CiarnOConn" above)

      On the other hand, the possessive pronoun "your" in the nominative case is translated as: (masc/neut/fem)

      • dein / dein / deine (for singular "your", informal);
      • euer / euer / eure (for plural "your", informal);
      • Ihr / Ihr / Ihre (for formal "your")

      And in accusative case, only the masculine ones change, to

      • "deinen"
      • "euren"
      • "ihren"

      great table here: "https://deutsch.lingolia.com/en/grammar/pronouns/possessive-pronouns"

      Hope that helps!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JWsama

      "Diesen" is a word for the dative case. Is this sentence in the dative case? It does not answer the question "to whom" or "for whom".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JWsama

      Sorry, found my answer. Overlooked "diesen" as masculine accusative.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kobby22

      Please can someone explain why 'diesen' was used?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

      Schmuck is a masculine noun. Also, this sentence is in the accusative case. Therefore, the word 'dies' in followed by an -en.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kim1947

      when "dieses" is translated as "this" and when as "that" ? Explain to me, please


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

      Das. For example, Das ist meine Katze. = That is my cat.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miriam689806

      Why is this so bad not as helpful as once was grrr


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrakharGup538624

      How would one say "I like your jewelry"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

      Ich mag deinen Schmuck


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tgvitor42

      "diesen" is because "Schmuck" is masculine?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabricio608752

      Why not "Ich mag dieser schmuck"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

      Schmuck here is the direct object, therefore we are in the accusative case. Since we are, the ending changes from -er to -en. Therefore it is 'Ich mag diesen Schmuck'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vincius237743

      Should i memorize the declations of "dieser"? It kinda sucks, any tip for that?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

      There are not too many, there are plenty of lists online that show the endings you use in certain cases. The variations include dies, diese, dieser, diesen, dieses, diesem.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

      This is because 'Schmuck' is a der word. Because we are in the accusative case here, the ending switches from 'dieser' to 'diesen'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viola264602

      Why is 'diesen' used for Schmuck?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

      This is because 'Schmuck' is a der word. Because we are in the accusative case here, the ending switches from 'dieser' to 'diesen'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luzzzzzyyy

      Diesen because Schmuck is feminine?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

      'Diesen' because Schmuck is masculine, not feminine.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamianScho

      Schmuck is also make-up..


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
      Mod

        No. You're confusing it with Schminke.

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