"Did you walk to school this morning?"

Translation:Ar shiúil tú ar scoil ar maidin?

4 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MrBallpeen
MrBallpeen
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Why is it "ar" and not "go dtí"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Just a special thing with scoil.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eoinmonaghan
eoinmonaghan
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Would it be because hedge schools. School was not always a building.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prony-dH-Bray

Nope. It's like in French where our teacher used to remind us that you go 'to' the butcher shop, but 'at' the brothel (and accessorily 'at' school). Like 'dul ar dinnéar', its seems connected to occasions where you assume your position (in the class, at the table) in a place where you have your place... Dul ar an bhfara: to roost. Dul ar garda: to mount guard. Dul ar pósadh: to go to a wedding. Mind you, you can opt for 'dul chun na scoile' if you wanted to...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siegfriedd18
siegfriedd18
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Interesting! In the same series I read "go dti an bhialann". Does your logic apply here to: would you say "ar bialann" when you had reserved a table? Or is the rule you refer to here to places where you usually have a place?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prony-dH-Bray

I would not call it a rule. More of a hunch...

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Sometimes ar translates as “to”, e.g. Bhí siad ar dinnéar againn. (“We had them to dinner“).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eoinmonaghan
eoinmonaghan
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Should it not be "ar maidin seo"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It’s not necessary for ar maidin in this sentence, given the past tense of its verb. Another way of expressing “this morning” is ar maidin inniu.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TurloughThunder

Why isn't the correct translation: "Did you walk to school in the morning?" ? I don't see where "this" comes from.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnieKetchum

Same here any explanations please

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sadhbh72

Yes, I'd like to know the same - I was translating into Irish and used seo, as I thought without it, the sentence could have meant far in the past - like something you'd ask your parents or grandparents.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
SatharnPHL
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If you want to be specific about referring to "this morning", the Irish is ar maidin inniu - ar maidin seo is considered béarlachas.

But unless context or tense implies otherwise, ar maidin is read as "this morning". If you are clearly talking about a day in the past, or using the habitual present or past tenses, "in the morning(s)" makes more sense.

1 month ago
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