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"Aquí hay una carta electoral."

Translation:There is an electoral letter here.

5 years ago

95 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lechuza-chouette
Lechuza-chouette
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This site has samples of cartas electorales. http://www.tallerd3.com/archives/3633 These are what the US post office calls "political mail ", which is mailed material promoting political candidates, referenda, or campaigns, to be distinguished from "election mail", which is any item mailed to or from authorized elections officials that enables citizens to vote.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markbooth
markbooth
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So junk mail should be an acceptable translation? ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

Or "postally transmitted demonization".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edwardpalumbo

When you get to 24 it is painful to continue with these lessons. They are general and terribly boring.The words just are not useful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

I don't believe anyone says "electoral letter" in the United States. What we would say is "campaign letter", or "campaign flyer"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
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Thank you for finally explaining this! So many confused Americans in this lesson!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WChorneau

So "electoral letter" is an incorrect translation, ¿no?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kah154809
kah154809
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Gracias! Very useful information.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/perfectneg

Has nobody heard of the term "voting ballot" which translates into carta electoral? What is a electoral letter anyway?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottann

exactly! I was wondering if it meant a voting card.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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Tried that with no success.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottann

OK then... thanks, ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkLerno
MarkLerno
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That was my translation, too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think the point here is not to teach carta electoral as a term, but Duo found a sentence with the grammar it was looking for and words we would recognize.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Does "voting ballot" ever translate into "carta electoral"? Looks like it's "votación" or "papeleta". http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=ballot

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GScottOliver
GScottOliver
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True–here in Nevada, the ballots are printed in English and Spanish, and papeleta is the word used.

And Barbara, for an 838-day streak, I'm giving you a lingot. Not that you need more lingots…

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Oxford Dictionary give the translation of "ballot" in Venezuela. Pretty obscure for this level of Spanish learning if you ask me (which no one actually did, of course)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bodhisattvah

It sounds like "carta electoral" isn't a ballot, but actually campaign information. Possibly from candidates/political groups. See the other comments from native speakers in other counties. I was confused on this too, until I saw their feedback.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I live in San Diego where many of the local radio stations have their studios in Mexico. That involves some requirements from the Mexican government and one is generally political ads, or perhaps better called State run ads about the political process. They are in English and not poorly translated, but there is something about them that is so distinctively Spanish, although I can't put my finger on exactly what. But I have gained some directly translated political terminology from them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daleswords
Daleswords
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On the discussion for another question ("Estas son las cartas electorales" I think it was), there is a long discussion from European natives suggesting this refers what in the US we call to vote-by-mail ballots. But this discussion seems to debunk that.

Natives, are we correct that this only applies to campaign literature mailings?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

jindr004. I just googled "an electoral letter and got 1510 hits. In the entire internet, 1510 hits, which is nothing. And guess what the top two hits were in ALL the internet? Duolingo. So obviously "electoral letter" is not a common term or phrase.

Even in Spanish "una carta electoral" is not all that common, only 23000 hits on google and once again the top hit was (drum roll please) Duolingo!

Unfortunately I think some of us get caught up in the emotion of feeling cheated when we get tripped up on a question (I know I do). One thing that makes Duolingo so successful is it brings out a competitive emotion. I think people sometimes unfortunately carry that emotion into the discussion.

Personally I think there is a better sentence that could be used instead of carta electoral.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bodhisattvah

Your Google results are probably limited to English. See the other comments in this thread to understand what this phrase, actually common outside the U.S., is about.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JANBOEVINK
JANBOEVINK
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Great comments, GregIhnen!! Spot on, people say around here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karimagon

I don't understand what this means. A letter from the elections office? A mail-in election? What they have here makes no sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

An electoral letter comes from a campaign or party, making recommendations about how to vote.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Usually called junk mail or more formally "campaign literature."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kumar.Listo

This is rather funny: the drop down help box describes the meaning of "electoral" as "election". But when you translate the above sentence like this, "there is an election letter here", DL promptly declares it wrong!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AriaBrei
AriaBrei
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Since I was confused by the whole 'letter ' thing, I tried¨ There is an electoral map¨ which is at least an expression that is used in English. Not surprisingly, it did not count. My question is, why? Can't 'carta' also mean 'map'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Because this is a set phrase, una carta electoral will always be an election letter. These are uncommon, but not unheard of, in the English-speaking world. I get them from my congressman every time he runs for re-election, usually using his government postal account to tell me how amazing he has been while in office. These can also be what is known as a campaign letter.

An election map would be either mapa electoral if you meant one in general, or un mapa de la elección if you wanted to refer to one particular election.

Carta, when used as a variety of mapa is used more like "chart" in English, and is most often illustrating navigation routes and natural features.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AriaBrei
AriaBrei
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thanks for the clarification!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HansThyssen

Clearly formulated. This was my problem as well, thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WhitePat

Can't carta alsos mean chart, which is what I put.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Yep, apparently it has that meaning, too, at least for the purposes of the Mexican National Election Institute.

http://www.ieeg.org.mx/pdf/Geografia%20Electoral/Municipios/m10.pdf

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. Chart as in nautical chart or map. Other things we call charts would be la tabla or el gráfico (or la gráfica)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aemann

I'm sorry, but "There is an electoral letter here" is just dumb. DL needs to have an expert go through their material. Way too many things like this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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We're their experts. The site is crowd-sourced. Report it, nicely, use the other reason in the submit reports and explain why you think the translation is wrong, or awkward, or whatever. I don't think there have been as many people getting to this level, and so some of the translations haven't been sufficiently vetted. 03-25-14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marliner

Agreed - the errors are getting worse and worse as the level increases.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Dear aemann and other similarly-minded nitwits,

I'm sorry, but complaints like this are just dumb and accomplish nothing except demonstrate your lack of consideration for others who aren't as easily frustrated or egocentric as yourself.

My experience is that the example sentences for this site are almost always taken from real-life examples found on the web (and the source of some of the weirdest phrases are online Spanish education courses). The exceptions are almost all loaded into the lower levels, where the staff composed a number of quirky phrases to make the first steps memorable (La araña bebe leche?). I would expect that Aquí hay una carta electoral existed somewhere on the web at some point in the past three years, and is a real Spanish phrase (in case you don't know how, this is how you can find examples of una carta electoral).

But I don't even think that is the problem here. What I suspect is that you are one of those who is frustrated by this persistent problem where Spanish is not English. Your comment is very similar to others I encounter on a daily basis where the concern is not that you don't understand the Spanish phrase, it is that you don't understand the English equivalent. This usually degenerates into a discussion of similarly confused people over parsings of the English side of the translation to force a kind of sense out of it, when the actual answer is always there in the Spanish if you go looking outside of duolingo. Once discovered, the context of the original will almost always make everything clear that you wonder about. Also, as a consequence, you discover how rarely the English-side debates get anywhere near the actual intent of the phrase and how obsessive some people are that it be the English that makes sense not the Spanish. Ésta es la gente que nunca aprenderá español.

i want to emphasize that this step where you go outside and beyond these lesson modules becomes increasingly important the further you go in the lesson trees. The phrases remain valid*, but because of the increasingly complex ideas and syntax being presented some sense of usage and context is essential to get a feel for what they mean. That knowledge can only be gained by not spending all your time trying to puzzle out the phrases in the lesson modules.

Now, in closing, I also want to point out that this phrase makes sense to pretty much everyone else except you. Therefore I will humbly suggest that the real problem lies within you, and that the a considerable percentage of us who use this site regularly would appreciate it if you would not post your inaccurate and unsubstantiated rants in a space devoted to discussion of the lesson. This space and this site are not all about you and how you feel about the lessons. Thanks

  • Trust me on this. I have been on this site years now and now make a point of checking the oddball phrases. Out of thousands, all but one has checked out. Furthermore, duolingo already has a team of experts that create the materials for the site, and when something has been even a little bit off the Spanish team in particular has been incredibly responsive to suggestions I have made.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dberthold

Great and thorough comment that is fundmental to learning any language, even English. Too many folks treat their native tongue as the lingusitic norm, when it's just one way of expressing ideas, feelings, descriptions, actions, and so on. Languages are rivers, not rigid highways.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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You didn't leave much space for more comments, jindr, so I'll keep this short.
As you suggest I did try looking up "carta electoral" (just like I do with many other words and phrases). There are few references and I was little wiser.
Then I opened the discussion page and it seems the English translation "electoral letter" is not used by English-speakers anywhere. Contrary to your claim it doesn't make sense in either Spanish or English.
Of course it attracts comment. How many reports have been submitted over the last two years? It is frustrating that, despite the claims of "crowd sourcing" and fixing "oddball phrases" and so on, nothing has changed … so who are the "nitwits"?
And then I read your comments that seem to be blaming the customers! Your essay is not helpful, jindr.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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I apologize to Malcom Gladwell for my part in so thoroughly frustrating his dreams of a crowd sourced utopia. Let me re-do the search I linked to in my original comment....

Odd, it appears that it is your failure to perform a proper search that may be the issue here. I find plenty of evidence that it makes perfect sense in both languages, which isn't too surprising since this is just a pairing of a common noun and adjective.

To begin, the usage is exceptionally easy to find in Spanish speaking nations.

http://www.psoemajadahonda.es/2015/05/16/carta-electoral/

http://www.powerbyjorge.com/analisis-de-la-propaganda-electoral-de-las-elecciones-andaluzas/

On the English side, there is a case to be made that this is now mostly an antique usage (also here) but it still appears.

https://www.facebook.com/ILoveHucknall/posts/619238991529320

These mailings are not nearly as common in the US as they once were, given that the US Postal Service is now mostly a taxpayer subsidized division of Amazon and is no longer in the business of information transfer. I do however still get electoral letters from my old school congressman every two years.

[Edit] I think it is best at this point to restate more clearly what I said in the first message on this thread. -When it comes to discussions like this one, no one but yourself really cares that you think some phrase is somehow "incorrect" just because you would not say it that way. If you really care so much report it, but don't bother the rest of us who don't have a problem with the lesson.

And why am I so bothered by this incessant silliness? I am bothered, and kind of angry, because there is such a thing as una carta electoral (see here if you still don't believe me). So my vehemence here (and elsewhere) is an attempt to communicate my disbelief that persons attempting to learn Spanish are refusing (yet again) to accept a lesson phrase just because the English translation is something with which they are unfamiliar.

My response to that is essentially, -Too Bad. There is no obligation on the part of any Spanish speaker to conform their language to your impoverished English vocabulary or grammar. Get this into your head - It Is Another Language.

Similarly I am a little bothered by the number of users who believe that their limited knowledge and imagination should decide the limits of what I am allowed to learn on this site.

And to that point, just what are any of you objectors suggesting as an alternative? The phrase carta electoral exists in Spanish, that has been established many times already. The most literal translation of those words are "letter" and "electoral", and "electoral letter" is what this thing is called in English. So by all means, please explain why "electoral letter" is unacceptable here (and just saying that you have never heard of one is an admission of ignorance, not an argument), and you must propose an alternative rather than simply saying you don't want to bother learning something.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I'll have to come back to this, but I did quickly check one of your references that caught my eye:
Electoral_Letter_of_Thomas_Farren_Labour - published 1915!
Really jindr, even an old geezer like me doesn't go back that far!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Thanks Talca, but I can assure you that I'm no nun! :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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One hundred years ago. Is that even history? In the words of William Faulkner, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." (Requiem for a Nun)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sirusjr

Exactly. Anyone relying on duolingo for their sole source of Spanish learning will inevitably fail to become conversational. Instead digesting other sources of actual Spanish dialog and writing is essential. For me this means Spanish podcasts and Spanish novels where you start to appreciate the beauty of the language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andru1485
Andru1485
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It's a political tract or pamphlet. 'Here there is' sounds wrong to me. I would use ' here is'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"Here there is" means something different from "Here is". There should really be a comma after "here".

"Here there is" means that at this place, there exists ...

"Here is" means "I am showing you ..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerrenceRocks

I agree. It should be "here is". "Here there is" sounds "unnatural" to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryl1
Cheryl1
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But hay = there is or there are.... not here is. Aquí está una carta electoral (Here is an electoral letter). I agree that the wording is awkward but it's translated correctly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheSnark
TheSnark
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Confirmed. "Here is" should be marked as good.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axixic1

Una carta is both a letter and one letter, no?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

If you wanted to translate this into British English, I think you would say "There is a campaign leaflet/letter here".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cuatro_dedos

DL- either "can" this question, or revise it to make some sort of literary & grammatical sense. No one even knows what is meant by "electoral letter". How about "correo campana" (campaign mail) or "literatura de campana" (campaign literature). A lot of us have enough problems with your transliterations, where "phantom" words magically appear when phrases are translated. So, when, for the convenience of using vocabulary, you start to "make-up" phrases or words that DON'T translate, it just increases frustration a notch or two. Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbc63
tbc63
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Electoral map is an expression indicating voting areas / districts; and, to me makes more sense than electoral letter. If map can't be used for carta here, where can it be used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nmase86
nmase86
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Why is the sentence "Here there is an electoral letter" not correct? Is this a duolingo error? Thanks.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bodleiana

agree, both should be possible

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vandermonde

I strongly prefer the "here" at the end, but the other way should be accepted too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Yes, the word "here" would most naturally be at the end of the sentence, but it is not incorrect to place it elsewhere.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wadenbeisser
wadenbeisser
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Really?? I'm not native in english, but "here there is..." sounds really strange to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Yes, "here there is ..." is natural to say English.

I guess it looks strange because "there" can be the adverb that is the opposite of "here". But in the phrase "there is", "there" is just a pronoun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackRue

That's correct and is now accepted by DL

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnRon

I get 1,930 hits when I Google "electoral letter" in quotation marks, so such a thing apparently exists--or did at some time--however obscure. I tried Ngram Viewer and got zero results.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/webpilot

That's not very many hits in the Google universe. I've never in my life heard of an electoral letter.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Maybe it's a British term?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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I'm British and I'd never heard it either. We talk about campaign letters, canvassing, manifestos and the like. At first I thought una carta electoral was a ballot paper or voting card, but it seems to be promotional material from candidates.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/notargets

What about ‘here is an electoral letter’? Is it acceptable?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JANBOEVINK
JANBOEVINK
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I translated it as just that, ie -here is an electoral letter- and was dinged. It seems to me it would be just what I would say if I opened the mail and wanted to mention this item (ie junkmail). 21May14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wadenbeisser
wadenbeisser
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Same question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Giny2015

Aqui hay una papeleta electoral. ????

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

In my original post I should have included something that I normally would have and I believe is good forum etiquette and that is to say how much I appreciate DuoLingo. It's hugely educational, fun and strangely enough it's free! I've recommended it to friends. And the discussions make it even better. Thanks to everyone who shares their knowledge.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistico19

This is very confusing. Most Spanish speakers from Mexico in my region use carta for card.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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My students use tarjeta for card. We've never discussed the word for letter. (They're mostly from Sonora, Mexico.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bueno837007

As in Carta Blanca! Or carte blanche. Or à la carte.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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You have your Italian and French down, but Spanish is somewhat different. In Spanish carta can mean letter, menu, map or nautical chart, or playing card. But most other cards like postcards, note cards, credit cards, and business cards use the Spanish word tarjeta. I have intermediate to advanced fluency in Spanish, French, Italian and Portuguese. I am always fascinated seeing how there are words that are identical, words with subtle variations and totally different words. Although Italian and French and Spanish and Portuguese tend to be the more similar, there are cases where any two of the four have similar words while the others are quite different.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axixic1

Can't carta mean card as well as letter??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adam-Rabel

I don't think so. That would be "tarjeta."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

This is completely unknown term to me--makes no sense! Choosing whether it meant chart or letter or card was a matter of eenie, meenie, miney, mo! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timspaf

last time i translated carta as letter and it was marked wrong this time i put card and it was marked wrong. really had it with duo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Try thinking of it as "voting card" and as a somewhat colloquial phrase. We have these in Canada. I get one in the mail every election. It's the best I have come up with after encountering this several times. Even though duolingo doesn't accept it :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcinLado

AQUI is here not THERE

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes, but hay is there is. It would be rather unusual in English to use the syntax of the Spanish sentence which more literally would be Here there is an electoral letter. That's because having here next to the expression there is seems strange in English. But that is not the case with the Spanish because hay would not be confused with allí or allá at all.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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To me, "Here, there is " sounds fine. But it needs the comma, and a little pause after "here" in speech.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes, which is not the case in Spanish. I was actually not trying to say it would be wrong, I was only explaining that there was some reason for changing the syntax of the Spanish. Probably this is partly a personal preference, but I would only say Here there are if I were actually showing the location. If I were making a more general statement about it, I would put here at the end of the sentence. Duo generally wants you to place this type of word where it would be most commonly found. It generally can reflect the same syntax, but it often would be somewhat more unusual.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GateAN
GateAN
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A Brit would ( probably) use the terms " electoral address " or "campaign leaflet" rather than the more literal " electoral letter" but the level (and number) of comments does suggest DL ought to look at alternative answers.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The problem, I believe, is this is not really a standard term for anything that I can find. If you google the term carta electoral, most of the hits are from this discussion. I looked at a couple of the other sources and got no feeling they were talking about one specific thing. In fact, one of the links seemed to be an editorial. My take is, if this isn't a standard term for one set thing, which I can't see that it is, just translating it literally is probably best. It may mean something in some places and something different in others, so to associate the term with something in particular might actually be misleading.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joycemelton
joycemelton
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i said election map which makes more sense than election letter; which no one would say in english

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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If we ignore the hyperbole and sophistry there are many useful comments here. It would help if you stated in which area "no-one ever says that". Whatever, it all helps us to understand that there are many versions of a language and that we need to listen at least as much as we speak.

I would make one plea. Please don't be like the stereotypical "Englishman abroad" (substitute an appropriate term for a citizen of any other country) who, when they find they are not understood, just repeat the same words but LOUDER! (And we all know there are plenty like that in these discussions.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
0liwia
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Isn't it rather a "voter registration card"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Yes, in some counties it is a registration card and sometimes that card is stamped to indicate that you have voted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlosDGuevara
CarlosDGuevara
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Electoral Ballot!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

In most parts of the English speaking world we would say 'electoral card'...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sharon_Kay

Just a dumb sentence. Never heard of an electoral letter.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanoarac6899
hanoarac6899
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There is no such thing as an electoral letter in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

I agree. What would sound right is "an election campaign letter"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barbs62

From the post at the top of this it sounds like it means campaign literature. Why not translate it as campaign literature? I guess because the mail is involved always?

Finally, I am tired of being told that this is a group effort when input by me leads to no output. Three more days to reach my goal.

3 years ago