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"¿Ahora eres un caballero?"

Translation:Now you are a gentleman?

5 years ago

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Goim
Goim
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After all that we have gone through? After all those years of neglect, sadness and loneliness? It is too late for us not to part.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Indigoes
Indigoes
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Is this a reference to something?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goim
Goim
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It's just a little follow up to the sentence xD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/havingfun89

This sounds like it would be a reference to Great Expectations. Just saying if it was a reference in the first place...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KJBrett

Nit pick: too late

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goim
Goim
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fixed! =)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleAppelg

i don't know if you are a native english speaker, but in this situation, to be more dramatic, you might want to shorten your last sentence to "it's too late for us." and leave it at that :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraQuinn23

That's beautiful, Goim! I love it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goim
Goim
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x)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/petee0518
petee0518
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First read this as "caballo"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGibbins

Caballero is also knight. So a man on a horse.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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The roots of the words are the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mirkwood11

Same, I was like: well okay now he's a horse.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saballama

Same, am I practicing witchcraft or something?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

I think that the word cavalier is also ok-ish (although uncommon, maybe used in a historic novel or something) in English, right? Its meaning is basically the same as gentleman, although gentleman and variants thereof are probably more common than cavalier nowadays, at least in non-romance languages (not just English).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil46

nice one! -now you are a gentleman-now you are one gentleman? where does that come from? You can't be two gentlemen?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kathryn.dr1

Does caballero also mean cowboy?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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No, caballero means "horseman; knight." Cowboy is vaquero (from la vaca, cow).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneePea

I thought the same thing. I'm pretty sure that's what I was taught in high school.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mrs.McKinney

that's what I was taught too...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaniBenn

Im pretty sure it can mean cowboy as well...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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No. Vaquero is cowboy. Mexican vaqueros are actually the origin of the American cowboy.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaquero

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saballama

It does mean knight, which is similar, I guess...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraQuinn23

Yes, same. I learned that it can mean cowboy in school, but in the DR they say "vaquero."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

I was taught the same in high school, but Google is backing Duolingo up on this one so I'm calling it poor teaching.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

Vamos, caballeros, seamos civilizados

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fueron
fueron
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Where i come from (Texas), a caballero is a cowboy.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krow10
krow10
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Yep. Me falla otro vez a causa de mi español tejano.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

This seems to be an American thing to think a "caballero" is a cowboy. Duolingo, Google Translate, and SpanishDict are all clear about "caballero" meaning knight, horseman, or gentleman. Maybe the American translation to cowboy has to do with the fact that we picture men who ride horses as cowboys?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

Yes, dictionary.com says in the second meaning that in the U.S. Southwest, "caballero" means horseman. So, I guess a Spanish gentleman on a horse in the West gradually became known as a horseman to the English speakers, and then we generalized it to mean cowboy. But, that is a US definition, not a Spanish definition. Very interesting etymologic and linguistic exercise!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Actually American cowboys are derived from Mexican Vaqueros (although Vaqueros was originally a Spanish term)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaquero

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/cowboy

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khonkhortisan
khonkhortisan
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This is what's said after someone forgets what they learned in the flirting section.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mws1225
mws1225
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So many narratives you can construct with these little context-free sentences....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/upstean
upstean
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ladies and gentlemen, i represent my answer.

"is it a horse now "

i know, i must study much more ^^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcabj
mcabj
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Cowboy is "vaquero"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fairbiz

Where is cowboy "vaquero"? Thnx.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beetle78

In Veracruz, México, and in San Luis Potosí, México, I believe it is...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StuartCox

M'senora

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rick8956

Am I the only one who has misread caballero as caballo and typed in "Now you are a horse?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lubyleslie

In English this is not the word order for a question.One heart down.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darthfuzzball

I could see this word order being used in a sarcastic manner, i.e.

Man: Let me get that for you. Woman: Oh, now you are a gentleman?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger595178

I'd really like to get the basics of the language before risking a punch by misjudging the phrasing of a question. Can Spanish reverse word order in questions? I don't recall seeing it in any exercises.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ogniloud1

Please please whats with the question marks ?? is this not a yes/no question, therefore in English the subject and verb change their position in statement and question. Statement - You ARE from Ireland. Question - ARE you from Ireland? I lost a heart because I translated " Now are you a gentleman? WHYYYYYY?????

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_smiles_

'Now you are a gentleman?' I think is the best English translation for this sentence. As earlier posters indicated, it has a subtext of skepticism or mocking to it.

While 'Now are you a gentleman?' lacks the subtext of skepticism and the speaker is more likely just trying to discern if the person they are speaking with is a gentleman or not, almost in a factual way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beetle78

"Now are you a gentleman?" should also be accepted. But a question does sometimes have the same word order as a statement. "Oh, you're from Ireland? That's one place I'd love to visit!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisWhatever

beetle, your example "Oh, you're from Ireland" has a different word order from "Now are you a gentleman?", and the Ireland example is, IMO, the more normal way of using a statement as a question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/plainanjelik

It's accepted now

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rsj1
rsj1
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I thought that after ser an article was not needed unless one specifies a certain type.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cc2014es

As a question it has to read in English:"Are you now a gentleman?" or for slightly different meaning and effect:"Now, are you a gentleman?" "Now you are a gentleman." is a statement not a question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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Either English must not be your first language, or you're a grammarian who fails to grasp natural speech. This syntax is completely acceptable and implies a bit of sarcasm or disbelief.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuliaEduarda1

Al ser una oración interrogativa, el verbo se coloca antes que el sujeto: Now are you a gentleman?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krow10
krow10
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A menudo es como dijó usted. Pero puede utilizar este orden de las palabras cuando se quiere dar a entender que usted lo duda. "Now are you a gentleman?" - a sincere question. "Now you are gentleman?" - I don't really believe that you are a gentleman, but that you may be acting like one out some ulterior motive.

[Edited to correct a misuse: the word is "ulterior" and I originally wrote "alterior."]

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manisha69

Can someone tell me why 'll' is sometimes pronounced as -y and sometimes as -j ? I am really confused with this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

The sound that "LL" makes changes depending on where you are in a Spanish speaking country. The same for "y" at the beginning of a word like "yo".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1156093725

mierda putos de perras

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginajones82

I sense a history there

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger595178

It's poor English to indicate a question by inflicting upwards at the end of a statement; it's much better to put the verb before its subject: "Are you a gentleman now?" rather than "Now you are a gentleman?" Try missing out the punctuation mark and see which is a question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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Wow this sounds sarcastic! XD Maybe the start of a sarcasm exercise?^^

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

Ironically, your question, "Maybe the start of a sarcasm exercise?" takes the same format as "¿Ahora eres un caballero?" by changing a statement into a question. It, too, could be construed as sarcastic or simply as a gentle inquiry. We can't know the meaning without a scenario. It could be anything from nasty, harsh sarcasm through all the shades of meaning up to a charming, flirtatious nudge for information.

I read the question with the latter thought of an inquisitive and reserved question. I can imagine a beautiful, young señorita standing beside a handsome man she knew when she was ten. He has just arrived on a horse and she goes out to meet him, flirting, trying to engage him in revealing what he has been up to for the past 10 years since she's seen him.

Or, I imagine a smiling mother engaging with her 4-year old son who has a sword in hand and is straddling a broom stick. He emphatically responds to the question with details of his adventure.

Of course, you probably knew that! :) Just clarifying for others who are newbies to foreign language in the written word. It's much different than hearing it and seeing it in context.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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If not sarcasm, I'd be imagining a game of charades

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/unchary

Why are there question marks?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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It's a sarcastic question that emphasizes ahora. It's just like in English, if you were to hear a woman say, "Oh, NOW you're a gentleman?" (implying disbelief).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

I know a lot of people have assumed this question is sarcastic, so I want to present an alternative, broader possibility. A statement said with an upward inflection can be a polite way of asking a question, can be flirtatious, can be a gentle inquiry, or can be many other things. Until we know the context, or can see the look of the face of the speaker, we have no way of ascertaining intent.

In the olden days, a person sometimes went away to school, at the end of which they could be considered a gentleman (up from simply being a peasant). So, I can imagine someone arriving home from his years away from his tiny village and his friends and family want to know if his status has changed.

There are much more up-do-date examples, too. See my above comment for those.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alena436056

Duolingo being a smartass...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbnerM28

Did you know "caballero" also means cowboy?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosFrancisco

The beatings will continue until the morale improves!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_its.liv.123_

the problem with this question is where i come from it means cowboy

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I do gather that there must be some areas where that may be true. But Spanishdict.com, Collins Spanish English dictionary and the Diccionario de la Lengua Española all do not support that definition for the word caballero, even with just a regional specification.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Caballero

And many resources on the web specifically sat it doesn't mean cowboy.

https://spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/13175/is-a-gentleman-a-cowboy.

This lack of acceptance means that this usage is not widespread enough to be taught by any general Spanish course. Until a usage is accepted in a standard dictionary, it will not be taught. Since language develops almost like a living thing, that may change over time. But until then it is categorized as regional slang or colloquial speech.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim91292

A knight would have been cooler

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Knight should work. I just think you would get to say that less often unless you haunt Buckingham Palace.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dracamy
Dracamy
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I live in Texas and a caballero is totally a cowboy, not a gentleman. No gentleman would be on a horse. If he were that would make him a catrin.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Your etymology is way off. The English word cowboy first appears in the 1700s. It is actually a translation of a Spanish word, but not caballero. It is a.translation of the Spanish word vaquero which is also related to the word cow, not horse.
https://www.altalang.com/beyond-words/the-etymology-of-cowboy/

Now I am not sure when the word vaquero came into Spanish, but the word caballero is more related to the English word cavalier which we got from French. Its origin is another group of men who rode horses: the knight. The knight on a Spanish chessboard is called el caballero. And even in Texas I don't think people start their welcome speeches with Ladies and Cowboys (Dames y Caballeros).

1 month ago