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"Non madame !"

Translation:No ma'am!

5 years ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/finn.fr
finn.fr
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Is ma'am accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Firstin
Firstin
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In an exercise where you click the words I was just required to click ma and 'am as my only option, so I'd say yes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Of course, "ma'am" is a natural expression in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoganErbah

We say mrs. for married miss for unmarried and ms. if we don't know in English. How is it in French?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
GlenM
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My francophone friends in Canada have told me that it's 'madame' for a married woman and 'mademoiselle' for a single woman. If we don't know her marital status we will use 'madame' for a mature woman and 'mademoiselle' for a young woman.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoganErbah

Thank you very much. How about the "safe" way. For example I don't know the martial status and I am not sure how to call (and don't want to be ridicilous or rude). I would guess madame is always safer?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Using "mademoiselle" is a way to flatter a middle-aged woman, though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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Madame is the safe way, at least in Montreal. I very rarely hear mademoiselle, unless it is to quite a young girl.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schatzie14

Same here, mademoiselle seems a bit old fashion, but other than in French speaking countries, " MADAME" could backfire

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MillieMaeH

I agree with you but when I put 'Mrs.' it said I was wrong. :-( Please Help!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
GlenM
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Mrs, which is an abbreviation of Mistress, is a formal address to a married woman. In English it is unusual to address a woman simply as Mrs. This would almost always be followed by her surname, e.g., Mrs Smith. There is a form of English slang which uses the word missus for a wife, e.g., My missus is cooking dinner. However, one would not normally say Yes, missus (mrs). Here in South Africa an employer might be addressed as Missus, just as her male counterpart might be addressed as Boss.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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You would only translate it as "Mrs." when used with the person's surname, e.g. Madame Jones = Mrs. Jones.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FawAshoor

does it come from Ma + dame ? as in "My Lady" listerally ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia.s.h
Julia.s.h
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Yes!Ma dame is an old French for my lady.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariahMathew

why not "no ma'am"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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It worked for me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janetkueng
janetkueng
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In one of my books it says madame means my lady ? Does anyone agree with this?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
GlenM
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That's exactly what it means :). 'Ma' = 'my', 'dame' = 'lady'. That is the original meaning, but for us, in English and in French it is a respectful way of addressing a married or older woman.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snommelp
Snommelp
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but ma'am is, in fact, an Anglified version of madame, oui?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia.s.h
Julia.s.h
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I think you mean " anglicised version" yes it is the same word with another writing .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snommelp
Snommelp
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...yes, anglicized. Thank you for correcting me, I knew it looked wrong but apparently my coffee hadn't fully done its job just yet!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia.s.h
Julia.s.h
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De rien :) I know about the magic of coffee.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cyndiluwho

I am happy that it accepts no ma'am.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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There is no problem with "ma'am". It is the standard contraction of "madam" and is the polite way to address a woman. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/ma-am?q=ma%27am

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bobjobbley

Madame- Married woman

Mademoiselle- Unmarried woman

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
GlenM
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Yes, basically, but you may like to read my remarks on this topic near the top of the page. It's apparently not cut and dried as it is in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolinaCo560451

Why not lady? ("Ladies and gentlemen" " Mesdames et messieurs")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
GlenM
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Now you've opened up a can of worms Carolina! Yes, the formal greeting for a mixed group is 'Ladies and gentlemen'. There is also a form of Bronx (I imagine) slang where a woman is addressed as 'lady'. Here in South Africa, an Afrikaans (South African Dutch, quite a lot like Flemish) speaker will often translate the formal 'dame' (pronounced dahma) as 'lady'. Having said all that, it is unusual, and would probably be considered rather gauche to address a woman as 'lady' rather than 'madam'. I suppose the reason for this could be that the French 'madame' literally translates as 'my lady' and since French was the language of the educated in England before modern English took over, we have retained the French form. To sum up, 'my lady' is a more usual, not to say genteel form of address than simply 'lady'. But we would only use the English 'my lady' when talking to a titled woman. So, 'madam' it is!

Perhaps there are others who would disagree with me here, since there could be regional preferences.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolinaCo560451

Thank you so much, it makes sense now :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phoebejoannamay

Did anybody else notice that the first suggested translation of "monsieur" is "Sir" with a capital "S", while the first suggested translation of "madame" is "ma'am" all lower case? Why is the male version capitalised and not the female? =S

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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There is a rule here: Monsieur and Madame are capitalized when their name is not given.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Don't read too much into that. When used with a person's surname (e.g., Madame DuPont), it would be translated as "Mrs. Dupont". When used without the surname, it would be simple "madam" or "ma'am".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobTheTriangle

i typed no mrs but it was wrong

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
GlenM
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We don't usually refer to women as 'mrs' (which is an abbreviation of mistress, by the way). When we address a woman respectfully we say 'madam, miss, or the modern Ms (pronounced miz).

2 years ago