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"Één op de vijftien kinderen eet fruit."

Translation:One in fifteen children eats fruit.

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RutterKR
RutterKR
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"One of the fifteen children..." Was not accepted, in my opinion it is correct English and sounds more natural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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Not really. 'One of the fifteen children' basically means that you can see fifteen children, and one of them eats fruit. But that's not the meaning of this sentence. It says that 'one in fifteen' children eats fruit, which is a percentage (about 7%). So: 'Seven per cent of the children eats fruit.'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whukriede
whukriede
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I do not believe that. A native speaker should step in here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RutterKR
RutterKR
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I am a native English speaker. To me, "one out of fifteen", " one in fifteen" and "one of the fifteen" sound correct but "one out of the fifteen" does not. Of course, I could have the meaning of the original sentence wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikBoyle
ErikBoyle
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I'm also a native speaker, but I think there are subtle differences between each of those phrases. "One out of fifteen" probably means a proportion of 1/15=0.0667, but it's not the most common. "One in fifteen" always means the proportion 1/15 and is the most natural and common way to say that. "One of the fifteen" means there is a group of 15 and one of them is being discussed. "One out of the fifteen" is also possible and it means the same thing as "one of the fifteen", but it is uncommon and a little more emphatic.

For translating this sentence, there's no reason to interpret it any way other than "one in fifteen".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RutterKR
RutterKR
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Actually yes, if it is not a specific group of fifteen childrenbut a statement about children in general then I am wrong I guess

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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The Dutch x op de x is a general statement. Had it been about a specific group of kids, this sentence would have been: Eén van de vijftien kinderen eet fuit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

I agree. This should be an acceptable answer

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlastairHaigh

I got this wrong by saying "one of the fifteen", which is very different to "one in fifteen" because it's specific rather that general.

The question is, how would you say, in Dutch, "one of the fifteen children" i.e. talking about a specific set of children rather than children in general?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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Then you would use "Één van de vijftien kinderen".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spacebarmen

Shouldn't the answer be fruits rather than fruit?

2 years ago