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"If we went to that restaurant, I would like to eat chicken soup."

Translation:Si fuéramos a ese restaurante, yo quisiera comer sopa de pollo.

5 years ago

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/philabamber
philabamber
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To my mind this is a second conditional sentence, meaning that the form should be: past subjunctive + conditional

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sandeepa2
sandeepa2
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This type of sentence is explained very well in "Practice Makes Perfect Spanish Verb Tenses, "

To quote from the book "At first glance, the second sentence appears to be in the conditional. However, the conditional tense is used to tell what would happen if a certain condition were met, for example, “I would like a cup of coffee if I hadn’t already drunk ten cups this morning.” But that is not the speaker’s intent here. He clearly wants a cup of coffee and he also wants to appear reasonably courteous, so he changes “want” to “would like” and probably gets better service as a result! To achieve this same sort of gallantry in Spanish, you need only to use querer in the imperfect subjunctive".

Hope it helps.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

But in this sentence, the second clause IS what would happen if a certain condition were met - namely," if we went to that restaurant". If that condition were met, then I would like the chicken soup. ? So I'm thinking it should also be accepted to say "Si fuéramos a ese restaurante, yo querría comer sopa de pollo". Native speakers?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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The important thing to understand about the imperfect subjunctive is that it means that it is VERY unlikely that you will go to the restaurant. Maybe you live in Iowa, but you've heard about this restaurant with amazing chicken soup in Vietnam. In that case, the condition probably won't be met. You'd like to go, but it's not likely to be possible.

The meaning would be similar to this sentence:

"If I could go to that restaurant, I would like to order chicken soup = Si pudiera ir a ese restaurante, me gustaría pedir sopa de pollo"

If it's likely that you could go to the restaurant, you would not use imperfect subjunctive in the if clause. If it's a possibility, you would use indicative and future: If I go to that restaurant, I will eat/order/try the chicken soup.

However, I agree that querría should be accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I am not a native speaker, but sandeepa2 explained that "quisiera" is just the more polite way to say it. Elsewhere in the letters to DL, I have read that "me gustaría" is preferred when you can dictate that your preference will be met. Accordingly, I think that using the imperfect subjunctive is a way of indicating to the coffee server that he or she is being gracious when he or she actually brings you the coffee. It's the equivalent of saying "thank you in advance."

No soy una hablante nativa, pero sandeepa2 explicó que "quisiera" es sólo la forma más gentil de decirlo. En otra parte de las cartas a DL, he leído que se prefiere "me gustaría" cuando se puede dictar que se cumplirán sus preferencias. En consecuencia, creo que usar el subjuntivo imperfecto es una manera de indicarle al servidor de café que él/ella es graciable cuando él/ella realmente te trae el café. En teória, el mesero tiene la elección. Es el equivalente a decir "gracias de antemano".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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This might be regional, but this native speaker's opinion about quisiera and me gustaría is interesting. She is from Spain.

https://www.quora.com/Is-there-much-difference-between-quisiera-vs-me-gustaria-when-ordering-food-in-Spanish-or-is-the-blunt-term-quiero-more-common

"In Spanish, both of them (quisiera and me gustaría) sound more like a wish about something that you would like to have, rather than a request."

"Nobody uses “quisiera” when ordering food (at least in European Spanish). It sounds odd. Even thought it is grammatically correct, it is not idiomatic."

"No one would say “me gustaría” when ordering food either, not even in a fancy restaurant. It sounds extremely posh to us to the point that I think I would only use it if I were to have lunch with the king and the queen."

For instance, I would say something like:

  • Si es posible, me gustaría probar la tarta de manzana (✓)

  • Si es posible, me gustaría la tarta de manzana (✗)

In some areas, people may be more blunt when ordering food in restaurants in Spanish from what I've heard. Using "quisiera" or "me gustaría" may seem fine in some areas but weirdly obsequious in others. I'd probably check with a local.

https://itsnachotime.com/ordering-food/

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pesapesa

Si fuéramos a ese restaurante querría comer sopa de pollo - duolingo marks querría incorrect but surely it could be an accepted answer being conditional, right? Also what's the difference between fuéramos and fuésemos? Anyone?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mehc012

Fuéramos and Fuésemos are equivalent...the imperfect subjunctive actually has two full sets of acceptable endings: ra/ras/ra/ramos/ran OR se/ses/se/semos/sen. There is pretty much ZERO difference between the two except that the 'se' series is less common in Central America, though it shows up in writings to add variation, sound fancy, or to help distinguish between ellos preterite and ellos imperfect subjunctive.

In all cases, the conjugations are formed by taking the 'ellos' form of preterite (-aron/-ieron), removing the 'ron', and appending the appropriate imperfect subjunctive termination (for nosotros, an accent is added to the vowel immediately BEFORE the termination).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Since quisiera is a more polite version of querría, then it should be accepted. Was this reported?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paul.coman

I used "me gustaría" and it was accepted. But I still don't get how quisiera is grammatically correct.

si + imperfecto de subjuntivo + condicional

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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In general, si + imperfecto de subjuntivo + imperfecto de subjuntivo or past perfect subjunctive doesn't seem that unusual to me. The clauses after the if statement are conditional in English, but I'm not sure that is required in Spanish. It seems that at least in some cases, imperfect subjunctive or past perfect subjunctive are okay.

For example:

  • "Si fuera cierto que entre ellos hay algo, él no hubiera venido aquí y me hubiera contado todo." = If it were true that there was something between them, he wouldn't have come here and told me everything.

  • "Si eso hubiera sido cierto, entonces ella jamás me hubiera obligado a casarme contigo" = If that had been true, then she would not have made me marry you.

Quisiera can mean either "I wish" or can be a very polite version of the conditionals "querría" (not to be confused with quería) or "me gustaría.

  • Yo quisiera que estuvieras aquí = I wish that you were here

  • Quisieran que yo tuviera un coche = They wish that I had a car

http://www.spanishpodcast.org/podcasts_con_transcripcion/161DT.html

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mahsazet

But why "me gustaría"? Why not "yo gustaría"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Oh dear. The verb gustar continues to confuse!

I suggest you read this HERE.

Other grammar websites are available; just Google "spanish grammar gustar".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mahsazet

Thank you, very helpful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valladolid14

You´re RIGHT!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julesew
julesew
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I agree

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJDVB
CJDVB
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We usually use "tomar" for the soup, instead of "comer". Being the soup mostly liquid. I doubt that's not how it is in Spain, but that's how it is in Perú.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ema17a
Ema17a
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We think the same in Argentina. We say 'tomar' instead of 'comer' with 'ice cream' and 'soup'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billj6
billj6
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If it's Spain it's probably gazpacho, not so liquid.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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In English I eat my soup (usually from a bowl or soup plate) with a spoon, or I drink my soup from a mug.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dennie54
dennie54
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It depends on the soup for us. It We eat chicken corn soup, but drink tomato soup.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Estud-UIMP

U'R RIGHT. REPORTING FROM IB. PENINSULA.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goodwilhealthy

I had fuimos instead of fueramos... why is that wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcelrm
marcelrm
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fuimos is the imperfect indicative (statement), whereas fuéramos is the imperfect subjunctive (desire, hypotesis...). so if it's a conditional sentence, you must use the subjunctive form

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph2
Joseph2
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Is it just me or is this not a proper sentence in English? The tenses seem to be mixed. I could swear we learned this form as "if we had gone, I would have eaten...".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esteban.ra
esteban.ra
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You are right this sentence is really confusing I don't think it makes any sense at all, the first part is in the past as the second in the future.. Translated as it is, it would be like "Si fuimos a ese restaurante, yo comería sopa de pollo"which doesn't makes any sense

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paul.coman

Your example expresses something that could have happened but didn't... and there's an equivalent is Spanish for that.

This, on the other hand, expresses something that might happen in the future. The English version sound off. A better way of saying it would be: "If we were to go to that restaurant, I would (like to) eat chicken soup."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markbooth
markbooth
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But this is "If we went" not "If we were to go". It is past subjunctive, or at least the first part is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grtxy

It's a perfectly ordinary present or second conditional structure: If + past tense (If we went), would + bare infinitive (would like).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thoronnar

I agree. I feel that the sentence should be either (past) "If we had gone to that restaurant, I would have liked to eat chicken soup" or (present) "If we go to that restaurant, I would like to eat chicken soup". The way it's written in the question feels strange to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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The Spanish "Si fuéramos a ese restaurante, yo quisiera comer sopa de pollo" means "If we were going to that restaurant, I would like to eat chicken soup."

If we had gone, I would have eaten...". = Si hubiéramos ido, habría comido... (past perfect subjunctive + past perfect conditional)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whitebabe
whitebabe
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I put "fuimos" instead of "fueramos" since "fuimos" was in the hints. Why is it wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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I put that also, but in the original the subject is talking about something that might happen in the future, whereas "fuimos" talks only about the past.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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In case you haven't seen it, marcelrm explains this well in his reply to goodwilhealthy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Why do I need to say 'UNA sopa de pollo'? Surely chicken soup is uncountable??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esteban.ra
esteban.ra
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It shouldn't be wrong, if you say Una you are just stating that you will eat/drink one bowl of soup

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

A heart stolen for leaving off the end e on restaurant when the sentence is darn hard. Ever heard of typos? Come on DL. Give me a break!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
drockalgzemoser
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Two things. First, WHY must this be marked wrong with the definite article in front of "sopa"? Second, is it correct in Spanish to say that you are "eating" a liquid food such as "soup"? Or is it slightly ambiguous sort of like English? Normally I'd just forget "eat" and "drink" and say that I'm "having" soup.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VerissimoFeijoo

In proper Spanish they do not "eat soup". They "have soup"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caellen

I got dinged for not saying "UNA sopa." Since soup is not countable, I think it doesn't sound good with "una" in front of it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrashMaster5000
TrashMaster5000
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I replaced the word quisiera with "me gustaria (with accent on the i)" but it is wrong. Does anyone know why?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

It may be because "gustaría" works different than most verbs and the subject then would be "sopa de pollo", so you would need to say "a mí" instead of "yo": Si fuéramos a ese restaurante, a mí me gustaría comer sopa de pollo.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinoBordin
LinoBordin
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The use of "a mí" os not necessary. Only "me gustaría" is correct. And the exercise would accept your answer Master5000.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paul.coman

I used me gustaria and it was ok, but in the way that Babella said: Si fuéramos a ese restaurante, me gustaría comer sopa de pollo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrashMaster5000
TrashMaster5000
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Ah, yes that must have been the problem, thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

You are welcome :]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pkocal

Once again, Duolingo is out to lunch; quisiera is in the imperfect subjunctive tense. It would be used like this- Si quisiera comer sopa de pollo, iria a ese restaurante. If I wanted to eat chicken soup, I would go to that restaurant. Any comments welcome.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark2020
Mark2020
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You can use 'quisiera' in the way you would use 'me gustaría' for example if you wanted to say 'I would like chicken soup' you can say 'Quisiera sopa de pollo'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paul.coman

I believe this is because they never use the condicional form of querer: querria. At least not the way the conditional form of verbs is normally used.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaudiaOli770612

I wrote restorán instead of restaurante, and said it was wrong, but restorán is accepted by the Real Academia Española! :/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Then report it. The course creators don't read these discussion comments.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitntodd

I used the conditional "iríamos" for the first part of the sentence. But DL uses the subjunctive imperfect "fuéramos" instead. Why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Si fuéramos in this context means "if we were to go" hypothetical and probably not likely.

Si iríamos would mean "If we would go."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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marcelrm explains this well in his reply to goodwilhealthy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bodhisattvah

Is the yo really necessary here?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yelena47217

The whole answer is displayed

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidRussnak

These longer more complex sentences need to go. For people who are still learning these are brutal in their demands on our ability to remember rules that have barely been explained, and have not been explained at all on the app. (Something I have sent numerous emails about over the past four-ish years I've been here, yet remains unaddressed.)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I disagree. Some of us want more complex sentences. Plus, this sentence is relatively simple as compared to many sentences in most reading material. If you don't want to learn past subjunctive, that's fine. You are free to avoid it. However, that doesn't mean that it should be removed for the rest of us.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeanneHinton

I thought both 1 and 3 were correct, but apparently 3 is not. What is wrong with that one?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janpot
Janpot
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It is not possible for us to see what your number 1 and 3 said .. :-(

4 years ago