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  5. "Granen växer i dalen."

"Granen växer i dalen."

Translation:The spruce grows in the valley.

January 17, 2015

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chreekat

I know it's been well explained already, but I would like to confirm that knowing your pines from your spruces is no joke in Sweden. I got called out on it pretty quickly. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beanybadger

Here's an [English language] way to remember, based on how many needles grow from each 'needle-bud':

Spruces have Single needles

Pines have Pairs of needles

Larches have Lots of needles

Hint: It alliterates!

Unfortunately I have no idea about firs and other conifers...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

I have "The Easy Way To Tree Recognition" by John Kilbracken.

It is arranged like a choose your adventure book.

"1) Are all its leaves needle-like? YES, go to section 2. NO, go to section 43."

"2) Do the needles grow singly?" YES, go to section 3. NO, go to section 29."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LudwigXIV

This reminds me of this sentence I learned whilst in Stockholm 'Dra dit pepparn växer'. It means 'Go where the pepper grows', right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandramorris1

can we also use the verb' vaxe' for children? or is it just for plants?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandramorris1

Thanks a lot, HelenCarlsson :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_Joao_Elias

So spruce is a Christmas tree, basically?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

Well, if it's a Christmas tree we call it julgran (Christmas spruce) and most spruces will grow much higher to become timber I suppose :).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophir

Who else guessed "grain"? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gringita88

I wrote "the norway spruce grows in the valley" after having googled "granen". Could you add this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

OK, why not – it is indeed a more exact name for the one we're thinking of, Picea abies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NogoBogo

Is "pine tree" not the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

No, that's "tall" in Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/impy_imp

I put vale and was corrected to dale (the only error in the sentence). The default answer seems to be valley. Is there a reason vale isn't accepted ? Are there words in Swedish that correspond more directly to vale and valley and dalen should really just be translated as dale ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, "vale" is technically correct, but... it's a little too 19th-century-poetry, don't you think? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/impy_imp

No, not at all! I use vale quite a bit... where I grew up is full of hills and vales. I guess cos I've always used vales for the landscape where I grew up, I tend to think of vales as less steep/deep than valleys and use valleys more for other places where the landscape has big deep valleys :) But I wouldn't be surprised if the distinction is perculiar to me. Though everyone says the vales rather than valleys or dales round where I grew up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiwiDressager

I would use vale on occasion though I agree that it is fairly poetic/old fashioned and is probably fairly regional as well. I suspect very few Americans would use it for example. I think I probably use it cos I am a bit odd and read a lot of Shakespeare and fantasy fiction when I was younger!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BalvinderC1

I would agree with the distinction you make between vale and valley. For me a vale is a much broader valley, though it might still have steep sides but not necessarily. It's more that it has breadth and could easily have more than just one river/stream that is shaping it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That's interesting. :) I'll leave it out of the accepted list for now, but that's duly noted, and if enough natives agree then I'll go back and add it later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seeheer

In England the word is dale. We have an area called the dales. It is where the poet Wordsworth lived. I would imagine that the word originated from the Viking's word dalen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

They're actually both from the same Proto-Germanic, then PIE source, so not from the Vikings - though given that so many of the dales are located in or around Yorkshire/the Danelaw, I would suspect that there was Norse influence in naming them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beanybadger

Some English place names use vale, for example the Vale of Eden in Northwest England.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhuletdev

Serious question: Is "vale" an English or Swedish word? I'm American, but I've never heard it before


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiwiDressager

English. A sort of poetic word meaning valley. It holds a more picturesque feel than a simple valley though...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimNolt

So here we're talking about one spruce? (The spruce grows).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, that is correct.

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