https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

Genitive and De

When should you use which. I really should know this but i forget :P

3 years ago

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SeaininMC

Could you rephrase the question? It's not clear to me what you are asking. Maybe some examples?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

ok well i came across a sentence 'is ball é den leabharlann' why wouldn't it be 'is ball an leabharlainne é'

but..

when i think about it the first example would mean 'he is a member of the club' while the second means 'he is the library's member'

could you confirm this for me?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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You’re on the right track. Consider these phrases:

  • rialacha de bhóthar (de: “rules of a road”)
  • na rialacha de bhóthar (article + de: “the rules of a road”)
  • na rialacha seo de bhóthar (demonstrative + de: “these rules of a road”)
  • rialacha den bóthar (den: “rules of the road”)
  • rialacha an bhóthair (genitive: “the rules of the road”)
  • na rialacha sin an bhóthair (demonstrative + genitive: “those rules of the road”)

The de form is used when both the governing noun and the governed noun are indefinite; the article + de form is used when the governing noun is definite and the governed noun is indefinite; the demonstrative + de form is used when the governing noun is modified by a demonstrative adjective and the governed noun is indefinite; the den form is used when the governing noun is indefinite and the governed noun is definite; the genitive form is used when both the governing noun and the governed noun are definite; and the demonstrative + genitive form is used when the governing noun is modified by a demonstrative adjective and the governed noun is definite. (The demonstrative phrases need the initial article to form their demonstratives.)

3 years ago
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