1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "Fear an chait."

"Fear an chait."

Translation:The cat's man.

January 18, 2015

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celt2

Great sentence!! Threw me right off :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeaininMC

"Madra an chait" would be good too, wouldn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeargalMcGovern

same here! You'd think I'd have got it seeing as before it I had answered "the man's cat"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellie-bell

Why is it the man of the cat and not just man of the cat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

In tips and notes of this section, it was explained that the article is used only once in irish, but twice in english (quote below):

"The definite article (in this case an) is used only once in Irish, where it is used twice in English."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

It sorta makes sense: the genitive implies that you are referring to something definite, so you don't need the definite article. (My reasoning)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/truthfinder

The author may be alluding to the well-known fact that cats adopt people and not vice-versa ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TuathaDeDanann

Particularly true in Dwarf Fortress. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elifoxfly

Why is the genitive of cat "chait" here, whereas it was "gcat" in previous questions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It’s the genitive of “the cats” that would be na gcat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

Thank you, I'd somehow missed that before I read your post.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/demazema

now that is just confusing aha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

Cat, pronounciation:

Wiktionary says: Munster, Aran /kɑt̪ˠ, but Cois Fharraige /kʊt̪ˠ/ 

Teanglann.ie sounds to me as if the Cois Fharraige (West of Galway) transcription matches the Connacht accent.

Apparently, "/ʊ/ is a near-back[ʊ] when all adjacent consonants are broad, e.g. dubh [d̪ˠʊvˠ] ('black'), and a more centralized [ʊ̟] after a slender consonant, e.g. giobal [ˈɟʊ̟bˠəl̪ˠ] ('rag')." (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_phonology#Consonants) But why is the 'a' in cat pronounced as a ʊ in the first place?!

In any case, note besides that the 't' is dental.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

1st declension: m. and ns. ends broad. Like most 1st declension nouns, weak plural.

ns. cat, gs. cait, npl. cait, gpl. cat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

The definite article triggers lenition of, i.a.:

  • f. ns.
  • m. gs.

(https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Irish_mutations)

-> an 'h' is inserted in gs. cait


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

Lenition:

  • Special case: s becomes ts (rather than sh).

  • Exceptions: d and t aren't lenited after the def article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

The definite article always causes eclipsis in the gpl. (irrespectively of the noun's gender).

-> na gcat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CelineHyne

Why isn't it fear na chait?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1458

The most helpful answer to that question will depend on why you think it should be fear na chait. What is there about "the cat's man" that prompted you to use na rather than an?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CelineHyne

Thanks. I googled every permutation of cat's/cats'/man's/men's and it helped. Except for cat men= fir chait .....

Related Discussions

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.