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  5. "Stai lontano da qui, hai cap…

"Stai lontano da qui, hai capito?"

Translation:Stay far away from here, do you understand?

July 31, 2013

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wulfrunian

How can you tell that the first clause is imperative? It still makes sense if, as I did, you put "you are far from here, have you understood?" You could be speaking to someone on the 'phone who is asking for directions!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flysalot

yes, this is what I wrote.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanna282584

That's what I thought too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

>>Stay far from here, have you understood?

Is this an acceptable translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

thanks - will report it when I can


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maloewe

nof fixed yet .. I have the same problem


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

some perverse soul seems to have marked us all down for even asking the question/seeking guidance/reassurance from the nice Duolingo community - I can't report the issue until the question comes around again on an exercise but will then do pronto - have marked you nice folks all back up ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/popemaria

Hai capito - why not, have you understood?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ioamoroma

Agree! Hai capito is past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flysalot

I feel that have you understood should be accepted but from conversational experience "capito" ie the past participle "understood" is used in a similar way to the English. When being given instructions in Italian it is normal to respond: "ho capito" not "capisco". Hence in this sentence, even though the Italian appears to use past tense, in English we would say "Stay away from here! Understood!" Or more politely: "Stay away from here! Do you understand?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kosheryosher

So does "stare" mean "to be" and "to stay"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jemmetals

It literally means to stay, but several idioms use it as "be" like stai bene? = do you stay well? = are you well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kosheryosher

So "stare" can mean "to be" and also you can use it to mean roughly "Be far from here", which is actually "Stay far from here," right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

my understanding of stare is to be and also the state of being, for example stay there, stay quiet. and the wellness how are you, come stai, sto bene grazie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/efdfirefighter20

I put, "You are far from here, understood" and it was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langenth

Why the past tense "hai capito"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biscuitamericain

in this sentence get it

in these parts, "Get it?''or even ''GET IT'' might be more in the spirit of '-hai capito''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/denisemelv1

i also put "you are a long way from here do you understand?" As if directing someone by pointing a place on a map. Sometimes it is very difficult to distinguish one translation from another and you can't memorise thousands of sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

I see where you are coming from. I think your translation would be better as " sei lontano da qui"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHar981284

Another 'wrong' one. I wrote stay a long way from here. identical meaning..and understand on its own is normal parlance. Dispiriting.

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