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"Ella no se había ganado nada."

Translation:She had not earned anything.

5 years ago

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"She had earned nothing." which sounds very natural is not accepted. It should be. In English, negation is often expressed that way!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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It should be accepted. I said the same and got marked wrong for it. Reported it though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Still wrong on 2015-01-14. Reported.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiaraColbert

They wont change it i reported so many times they took away my report privelegies

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stellapoxon190
Stellapoxon190
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I agree. I did the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rich708239
Rich708239
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'She had earned anything' is accepted as of Jan 2018

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It should be either "She had not earned anything" or "She had earned nothing."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackstewart2

You left out the "not." Nada translates to nothing, but no translates to not. Basically, you left out a word and that's why it was marked wrong. As to the reflexive, I'm not sure on that myself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Changing the anything to the use of the word nothing is the same as using a negative before the verb. If you wish to translate word-for-word, Duolingo is the place for you., but languages don't behave that way. The DL programmers need to add this as another possible answer. But in a year's time, the staff has been putting out larger fires.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

Could someone explain why this is reflexive?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

From what I understand (from getting this wrong before) it is because the verb 'ganar' means 'to win' or 'to gain', whereas 'ganarse' means 'to earn'...I'm guessing that this is because when you have earned something, it is as a result of your own actions. Hopefully someone can give you a better informed answer soon, but for the time being, that's my take on it :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

See below

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JKeithForChrist

In Spanish, you use the reflexive when the indirect object (the part of the sentence telling to whom or for whom) is the subject. It is implied that she had not won anything for herself, so the reflexive is used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cookj

Why is "she had not gained anything" not acceptable?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

I think that this is because when the verb 'ganar' is reflexive, it means 'earned', and not 'won' or 'gain' like it can without this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

According to Spanishdict.com, ganarse can mean to earn or to win, e.g.

ha sabido ganarse el afecto de todos = she has managed to win everyone's affection

In fact, on another question in this lesson, Duolingo uses "ganarse" to mean "to win": "Él se había ganado un premio" Duolingo translates as "He had won a prize."

The question then is, if ganarse can mean "to earn" and "to win", can it also mean "to gain"? Personally, I see these as splitting hairs and virtually synonymous (i.e. "to gain" is somewhere between the definition of "to win" and "to earn" in many cases), though others may disagree.

So to me, it seems not valid to say that "Ella no se había ganado nada" cannot mean "She had not gained anything", and I've reported it to Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

Nice reply, and you're right, there is not a massive difference between win, gain and earn so "She had not gained anything" is probably OK.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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The hint lists all 3 options for the reflexive form:

se había ganado

(I/he/she/it/you) had gained

(I/he/she/it/you) had earned

(I/he/she/it/you) had won

If 'gained' is wrong, it should not be listed. I chose 'gained' because it's the first choice, and was marked wrong yet again (March 2015).

Something similar happened to me with another question in this lesson, for 'demostrado'. The hints listed "showed, proven, demonstrated". I chose the first one, 'shown', and was marked wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

DL is very confused on this - on an example two examples ago it rejected "ganarse" for "earned" and simply used "ganar" ( ie rejected SE habia ganado) but in this example it DOES use " SE habia ganado" for (had) earned.....AND in the posting above swingophelia says DL is using "ganarse" for "win"??

I had thought that "ganarse" was "earn" and "ganar" was "win/gain" but now am very confused but it looks like they are interchangeable??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SparklyYimYam
SparklyYimYam
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I don't understand this either. It was the top suggestion too!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I assume you mean the dropdown lists that appear when you hover over a word. These are not suggestions they are hints. Just like looking in the dictionary (which I strongly recommend), you get possible meanings which may or may not be relevant to the example sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susiseller

Sorry, I still don't get it. Why is this reflexive, but the answer to the previous question "Ella había ganado más dinero" = "She had earned more money" is not?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roxymags
roxymags
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I would also like to know this, I put "Ella se habia ganado mas dinero" for that question and the se was crossed out. It doesn't seem to be very consistent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daveduck
Daveduck
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I'm not sure that this is reflexive, but rather a clarification that it's a she, not a he, who won/earned/gained.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

"Ella" is the subject, which is obviously feminine.

"Se" can never clarify gender because it can mean himself, herself, themselves, and itself when it is used in the reflexive form; him/her/them/it when used as an indirect object; and one/they when used in the passive voice; among other things, I'm sure.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucky101man

'She had not earned herself anything.' I wouldn't have bothered including 'herself' if the 'se' Wasn't there. I would have thought if you dropped 'se' it would just be 'She had not earned anything.' Anyway... boooo!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tumler100

She had not earned anything herself. Why is this less correct than whithout ”Herself“? Reported

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Lucky, I totally agree! If Duo did not want the word se included, why was it in the sentence? I think Duo is playing with our brains!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FraserMcFadyen

"She hadn't gained anything" is also possible

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/howcheng
howcheng
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She ain't won nothin'!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott5940

Not grammatical but perfectly understandable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EaterofPumkin
EaterofPumkin
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Why not "she had earned herself nothing."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

I'd also like to know if, "She had earned herself nothing" should be accepted for "Ella no se había ganado nada."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

she had not earnt anything should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Earnt is really archaic and is not in most dictionaries. Earned is what is used instead.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goshgollygod
goshgollygod
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Would "She had not gotten herself anything" be an acceptable translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sihayanami
sihayanami
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Probably not, since there are lots of other words for "gotten/to get."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeviousXevious

So in Spanish I gather double negatives are not only okay but the rule? Because "I had not won nothing" would be incorrect in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liznic48

I'm very fluent in Spanish, but I have always wondered if it is OK, because I think "Ella se ganó nada" is also correct...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andiness1

To answer this, as I learned in my small amount of formal education in Spanish, always use double negatives. Unlike English, where a double negative actually makes a positive sentence, you should use a double negative unless using the word nunca or jamás.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tajar
tajar
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Neither was 'She had won nothing'. IMHO She hadn't won/earned anything is the same as the above. Oh well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellylava
jellylava
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How then would you say, "She had not won/gained/earned herself anything?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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I think you're confusing some vocabulary here: win = ganar; acquire = ganarse; achieve = lograr; succeed = lograrse.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellylava
jellylava
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SpanishDict.com gives as translation for all three - win, gain, earn as ganar. I am thinking of a situation in which someone has said sarcastically about another's behaviour, " She has not gained herself anything!" ie She has behaved like an idiot and lost her friends' regard for her... so I agree that achieve could have been used but my phrasing is perfectly normal within my circle. But I think you have supplied the answer anyway, that in Spanish you would use lograr or lograrse.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Why suggest "gain" for "ganarse" and then mark it wrong when used?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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Reported "earnt". It is commonly used in Australia.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Really!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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Yup! We also say "dived" as well. Although that is becoming less common.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oleron3
Oleron3
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PLEASE continue to say dived. Dove makes my teeth itch. Gah.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Thanks Meredith. Please note that I didn't intend to imply any criticism. It fascinates me to watch languages evolving.
I hadn't heard earnt before, though I certainly use learnt and burnt, and we still have bent, lent and spent (not bended, lended and spended). Are these new word forms or are we reverting back to old versions? Maybe we will be using thee and thou, thy and thine again sometime in the future!

I remain thy faithful servant and colleague, Roger Christie

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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Oh ye gods no! Ye made no offence ye good sir.

Yeah, us 'Strayans (Australians) use them old style words on occasion. We also have our own strange ways in talkin. The more we insult the more we like ya, we have our own idioms that even we don't understand (don't give me the raw prawn) and others that could only come from here (he's such a galah - he's an idiot) or my personal favourite "he's built like a brick sh**house" (he is of a reasonable size and muscular structure). We shorten everything to two syllables that usually ends in an "o". Servo (service station), milko (milkman), metho (methylated spirits or REALLY bad alcohol), garbo (garbageman), arvo (afternoon), smoko (morning tea break)... The list goes on. We also understand that Woolloomooloo is a perfectly reasonable name for a place. As well as Woolloongabba, Murwillumbah and Mullumbimby.

Yup, language is a strange and wonderful thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I don't wish to get into a lingot competition, but if my little contribution is worth one then yours is worth at least two. (but I'm pretty mean, so two it is!)

Oh yes, Meredith, I propped against a few of those "brick sh**houses" when I played rugby!

Galah --- not wishing to show my ignorance, I do believe that's Kakatoe roseicapilla (OK, OK, I did look it up).

So ... it seems one of your fellow Strines was visiting England. He pulled over to the side of the road and called out to a passer-by:
"Scuse me mate. Is this the road to Loogabarooga?"
"Sorry pal, never heard of it."
"Yeah mate, Loogabarooga. S'where my friend lives. Got his address written down here..."
And he passed over a scrap of paper which said ... [see next message]...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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... 43 Main Street, Loughborough.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

It looks like you can use either "ganar" or "ganarse" because they both mean the same thing. Is that correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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ganar means "to win" (like a game or a contest or a race, or a prize, the lottery, etc.) and also "to earn." The reflexive use means "to earn one's living" or, obviously, to earn something by the subject's own efforts. But you can use that meaing non-reflexively, too: Gana un buen sueldo. (He--or she--earns a good wage.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richie181012

Is it me or Duolingo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielFloy4

Nothing is also correct....I reported it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

If you translated, "Ella no se había ganado nada." to mean "She had earned nothing", you would be okay. But, if you said, "She had not earned nothing", I think it would probably not be a great idea to accept it because, even though it would be understood, it is normally not acceptable to say a double negative in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielFloy4

I didn't pick up on the double negative. Thanks for the explanation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryThornton

this sentence sounded like it was fake.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryThornton

almost makes no sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DebbieDrum

should also accept "earnt" which is past tense of earn

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Deborah, "hi" from the USA. Some of those Aussie sayings were a real hoot! Regarding several verbs ending in "-nt" suggested in this thread for past tenses, the only one used commonly HERE is "burnt," for example, burnt toast.

The study someone provided, showing use of that style of verb to be at a mere .05% worldwide, wouldn't raise any expectation for Duo to recognize it, though it's fine to use regionally.

Let me be clear before I say the next part; I am from the "Deep South," and in casual talk or joking with friends, I may say, "Ain't you got no manners?" or, "Didn't yo' mama teach you nuthin?" But even we no longer use the archaic style of "learnt" for real conversation, because no matter how smart we are, people from anywhere else think we sound ignorant speaking that way.

There used to be a TV show with Andy Griffith and Gomer Pyle depicting "hillbillies," or people now mostly called "rednecks," who had VERY deep-South accents unchanged by mingling with other regions, and they would use ALL of the ones mentioned farther up the thread.

I think it's interesting linguistically that those are heard commonly in street lingo in big cities in the North, although the northerners or city folks would NOT like their speech compared to that of southern "rednecks"! ;<)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Loyla16
Loyla16
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I dont get se, its hard idl

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonypress

She hadn't won a thing.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack872103

She didn't know that She had won nothing was marked wrong but seems reasonable to me.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robert442980

She had not won anything. Worked so dont think the ganado part is the issue its you need the not and anything part.

2 months ago