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"Actually, they are right."

Translation:Effettivamente loro hanno ragione.

July 31, 2013

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viaggiatore

That's the expression: avere ragione means being right and avere torto means being wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

"In realtà hanno ragione"- is this correct? DL didn't accept it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annalinda13

I just used that and DL accepted it as correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidRuggi1

Inconsistentamente


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mephistos

Yes, it is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blazinghaze

' si have ragione e dámmole ragione, e si have tuorto e dámmole ragione, ca sempe have ragione chi vò' bene '


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrzej00001

" 'O cunto 'e Maria Rosa "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrzej00001

A lira fa 'o ricco a crianza fa 'o signore


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hschaffer

Can't we say sono giusti?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangoHero1

I think that's more like saying fair/just than saying something is right /correct (in which you'd use avere ragione). I could be wrong though!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asraelite

What about "corretto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giorgio182480

Never heard this (which doesn't mean much), but I'd understand it to mean that they are of a "correct" character. Like they cannot be bribed.

If you think about it, the English "being" right is odd because having a correct opinion about something isn't a state. You could be right and wrong at the same time! (About different matters).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

As far as I can tell from Reverso Context you use avere ragione to refer to a person being right but sono giusti for non-human things such calculations, suspicions, methods etc. Here are some examples of using sono giusti to mean "are right" (none refers to people):

http://context.reverso.net/traduction/italien-anglais/sono+giusti

And here are some examples of hanno ragione meaning "(they) are right" (most refer to people and those that don't are actually using the inanimate object to refer to the people who are responsible for it e.g a country, book etc)

http://context.reverso.net/traduction/italien-anglais/hanno+ragione#are+right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wshvet

Yes, I would love a native speaker to comment - I understand 'avere ragione', but is the above actually incorrect? Or just not used? Or has DL missed a valid sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwsmithdc

Infatti, hanno ragione. Not accepted July 22, 2014


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nullusaum

This was just presented to me (March 2015) as one of the multiple choice answers - and marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oktaya

Infatti is not a direct translation of in fact.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofia222677

As a native Italian speaker, I confirm that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger527376

April 2020, still not accepted. Frustrating, these nuances in adverbs, without context...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus979399

Errore!! Veramente is "truly" NOT "ACTUALLY"!! I put " attualmente " which is "actually" and got it wrong!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynnSerafi

"Attualmente" is a false friend. It doesn't mean "actually" but "currently" (as in "at the present time"). When I was in Italy I had to correct myself constantly over this! "Effettivamente" is a good translation for our English word "actually". I used "in realtà" a lot in Italy too, but I feel like "effettivamente" is slightly more literal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhillipStanley

Thank you, LynnSerafi. I find this explanation most helpful .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

Same for me ( 12. 12. 2015)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElOtroMiqui

I used "In realità" as a translation for "actually" (like the suggestion told me) and I got it wrong :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idlewyld

It's "in realtà"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

Also it was not accepted....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nitram.

It is still not corrected as of 26/08/2014


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmopolita61

It's the same in French by the way (ils ont raison),and we also have the same expression in German (sie haben Recht)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolsduol

What about "sono giusto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynnSerafi

"Giusto" is used to describe things, not people. A sentence can be "giusto" or "sbagliato": "Questa frase non è giusta, bensi è sbagliata."

But the person who spoke the sentence can "avere ragione" or not (avere torto): "Sì, hai ragione. Ho torto. Ho fatto un errore quì."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sfoehner

"Hanno ragione" is the general way to express "They are right" in Italian. If you did use "essere", you would have to say "sono giusti" to make it grammatically correct, but I believe that has more the sense of "They are just".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judi362744

Thank you for someone finally telling us that "hanno ragione" means "they are right" in Italian. It's nust one more of those sentences i have to memorize.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianadleme

And what about "sono certi"? Please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeMauro3

Why not "loro sono ragione"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/divaluisa

Duo rejected "hanno ragioni" Said I used plural instead of singular. Isn't hanno (they) plural? Or is avere ragione an expression that does not match number.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sfoehner

It's because you used the plural of "ragione". It should be "Hanno ragione". You don't need to make ragione plural here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTa189714

why not plural of ragione - they is plural so they are right(s)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard754173

The word 'right' in English has different meanings, and these are translated using different Italian words. Ragione and diritto, for the meanings in this discussion (though there are many more). "to be right" is "avere ragione" (literally, to have reason) "to have rights" is "avere diritti" So, if talking about a persons rights, you could say - 'Ci sono i nostri diritti..' (They are our rights"), or '(Loro) hanno diritti.' (They have rights.), but you would not use 'ragione' to express this use of the word 'right'. Furthermore, you would not use the verb 'essere' with 'ragione' to express that a person is (in the) right, though you could use 'essere nel giusto' (to be in the right). I hope this is more clear than mud. -Richard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Because it only agrees in number and gender if you use essere not avere, and you are right basically literally translates to 'you have right' or you have correctness. It's not the way English does things, but because it does use that auxiliary verb ragione stays singular in situations like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bill_oneill51

"veramente" should also be accepted as a correct translation of "actually."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/russodo

Mar 26/14: D.L. accepted veramente for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/divaluisa

What does "realmente" mean, if not actually?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cptwunderlich

I think 'actually' is tricky to translate. I'm not an English native speaker and it translate into different words in German and it's the same for English... I thought 'progriamente' might be it, but alas...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PanosDiCucchiaio

Effettivamente?? Davvero? Si usa così?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafforza

Is Anzi wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmySpatula

I don't know why 'anzi' isn't accepted. In english you use actually to clarify or correct someone so it sometimes means 'on the contrary' so i think anzi is a correct translation of actually


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bananaheadjjo

Infatti, hanno ragione not accepted 28 dec 2015


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

Infatti is not the same as effettivamente. Infatti means "as matter of facts", or "in fact", but the meaning is narrower in Italian than in English, and doesn't cover the effettivamente. When I've learnt English it gave me lots of headaches to accept that English tends to smear the differences between small details like this, what both Italian and my (Hungarian) language are keen to express. :) For the other way, perhaps it is even harder :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aloracthur

Infatti, hanno ragione Why is this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gkmmccall

I put' averamente sono corretti" and it was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CalBR

Perché non "... sono certi"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoitaliano

Would the translation work as:

Di fatto, loro hanno ragione

?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

duoitaliano: Duo accepted my translation: "Di fatto, loro hanno ragione" (Aug. 21, 2020).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SMCave

in realtà hanno ragione- should be ok


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uxSY4nUr

What is wrong with hanno effettivamente ragione?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofia222677

Nothing. It's not literal enough for DL standards, but it's not an error. It should be reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scottishmags

I thought infatti could mean actually?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curlygirly

Can someone confirm whether these two things really mean the same? "Have reason" - isn't this different to being "correct".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

Calbr: That would mean they are sure, but not necessarily right. Sono certo would mean that I think I am right, but it is not confirmed. ho raggione means that I am right and it is confirmed (by the facts, by experience, whatever).

Curlygirly: It may be true for the English (though I think it is not so similar) but definitely not true for Italian (and a bounch of other languages). Avere raggione is not "have reason" (that would be avere un motivo ) but "being right" (or correct, but that may mean other things, too. like acting the correct way, etc.)

IMHO. But I am not native in any of the two languages. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curlygirly

Ok, makes sense if it is an expression. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radamian

DL suggestions for each part of this resulted in a wrong response.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muyil

DL suggestions are often misleading


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rosemarie139718

giusti' should be accepted. Its meaning is translated in my italian dictionary as 'right' as the first meaning and 'just' as in fair, as the second meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stuart.hol2

What is "atualmente" if not actually? Duo wants me to use "veramente" which surely means really or truly, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sfoehner

"Atualmente" means "currently".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stacymitch

Infatti works as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rcpjenn

According to my 3inch thick Harper Collins Sansoni Unabridged Italian Dictionary, "sono giuste" is the most correct answer. Hope that helps. Also, I have reported it (not that it will do much good----sigh!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

That would be 'they are right/correct' when referring to answers in a book, not people. You might argue it but...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muyil

Previous lesson we couldn't use 'loro' for 'they'. Next lesson, DL says 'loro' is 'they'. Please, can any native speaker explain this? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YehonatanTs

The direct translation is that they have the right/reasoning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeannieCapp

I wrote "infatto" and duolingo suggested "di fatto" instead. Can anyone explain the difference and when to use each? Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

JeannieCapp: I think "infatto" means "in fact" whereas "di fatto" (as an adverb) means "in effect" whether by right, or not, and, as an adjective, "existing" or "actual" (A de facto one-party system).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rcpjenn

An exersize like this can really make me hate studying Italian------AND DL!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovanniCootes

What about "attualmente?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard754173

See the comment from 3 years ago by LynnSerafi, above. https://www.duolingo.com/LynnSerafi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John356013

Constant picking on spelling is not productive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynneVD

why isn't it sono as 'they are' and 'hanno' as in 'they have'

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