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https://www.duolingo.com/Miriam_MM

Cuál es la diferencia?/What is the difference?

I want to know, what is the difference between these words: Oh my god (oh dios mío), Oh my gosh and Oh my godness!

Quiero saber cuál es la diferencia entre estas palabras: Oh my god(oh dios mío), Oh my gosh y Oh my godness!

Hace 3 años

8 comentarios


https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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'Oh my God!' has religious connotations, so both the other versions (gosh/goodness) are just alternate expressions meant to circumvent that. While the first variant of the expression is most widely used, and commonly accepted, the latter two are safer options if you have any fears that the first may not be deemed appropriate by those around you.

Some Christians feel that you shouldn't take/speak your lord's name in vain, and won't use the phrase with God in it for fear of sounding blasphemous. On the other hand you have atheists, agnostics, and those of faiths that do not believe in a god, who will not use the phrase; either as a sign of respect to those who do believe in God, or just because the phrase holds no true meaning for them.

Hace 3 años

https://www.duolingo.com/writchie4
writchie4
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I might be in the minority with respect to this, but to me the phrase "oh my god" has become so commonplace (especially online and via SMS) that it's lost a lot of its religious connotation. I look at it nowadays as just an alternative to "wow". The two others (gosh, goodness) are kind of a joke to me. I get that their use is well-intended to avoid insulting anyone, but everyone (including whatever God you may worship) knows what you're really saying. :)

That said, there's certainly people that consider the phrase to be "using the Lord's name in vain" and wouldn't react well to it in polite conversation. It's just one of those "use at your own risk" phrases, depending on your audience.

Hace 3 años

https://www.duolingo.com/Miriam_MM

So then, the three expressions have the same meaning but you use according to the situation you are, I am right?

Thank you for your help!

PS: If I don't write good, can you correct me if you want! that help me to learn!

Hace 3 años

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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I'm not a native, but it's my understanding that most people see them as interchangeable and having the same meaning, but -some- people make a distinction because the first version has the name of God in it. If I were you I wouldn't call it out in church, or use it in the company of someone you knew to be conservative Christians, but aside from that you should be safe to use the expression. :)

Personally I don't use it, nor the Norwegian equivalent, but I'm an atheist and it's a choice I've made for myself - not one I would want to impose on others.

Corrections: "[...]but you use them according to the situation[...]", alternatively "but are used according to the situation". "am I right?" since it's a question. "If I don't write well" as well is the adverb version of the adjective good, alternatively "If I've made any mistakes". "you can correct me if you want!" (since you didn't make it into a question. With a question mark at the end 'can you' would be the correct construction), alternatively "could you please correct me?". Your English is already very good. :)

Hace 3 años

https://www.duolingo.com/Miriam_MM

Thank you for all! your corrections will allow me to learn better!

Hace 3 años

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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¡De nada! Good luck on your language journey!

Hace 3 años

https://www.duolingo.com/roxana.victoria5

My English teacher always said "my goodness" and he always expressed that he was an atheist. Maybe the phrase or the God's name aren't important to him.

Hace 3 años

https://www.duolingo.com/rumnraisin
rumnraisin
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If you search for "minced oaths" you will find a number more phrases to express both explicit oaths and religious oaths.

I'm only not providing a search link because there are strong swear words on most pages which list these.

"Gosh!", "Goodness!", and "Golly!" all seem rather antiquated (and I suspect the last could be misinterpreted). I get odd looks when I use them. :-)

Hace 3 años