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"Moet je vandaag werken?"

Translation:Do you have to work today?

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/donaldjmccann

"Must you work today?" seems like a reasonable solution

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobSimpson1

As always, "report it as correct" if you think so.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msmith1047

Still not accepted as of 17 Feb 2015.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rfrasier
rfrasier
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accepted 12 mar 15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Le-trois

What is the difference in context between:

"Moet je vandaag werken" and "Hoeft je vandaag werken"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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The second one is incorrect. 'Hoeven' is always used with 'niet' or 'geen'.

  • Moet je vandaag werken? - Do you have to work today?
  • Hoef je vandaag niet te werken? - Don't you have to work today?
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gtatk
gtatk
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Can moeten also be negated? As in: Moet je vandaag niet werken?

And if you can, what's the difference between niet moeten and niet hoeven?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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Yes, 'moeten' can also be negated. In general, 'niet hoeven' means that something is not necessary or desirable, and 'niet moeten' means that it is necessary that something does not happen.

  • Je hoeft niets mee te nemen - You don't have to bring something, but you may bring something if you want.
  • Je moet niets meenemen - Don't bring anything with you.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheGrahamCable
TheGrahamCable
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So it's kind of like 'must' and 'have to'? In the affirmative they mean almost the same thing, but when negated the meanings are very different. - 'must not' and 'don't have to'.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azevedof
azevedof
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Why don't we drop out the t of moet ("Moet je vandaag werken") in this sentence, if it is referring to the 2nd person singular? Shouldn't be "Moe je vandaag werken"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gtatk
gtatk
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I think because essentially that 't' is already removed. Since the stem "moet" in moeten already ends in a t, you don't add an extra one for the 2nd person singular. Similar to Praten: ik praat/jij praat. Eten: ik eet/jij eet. When you invert the second person singular, the verb should be identical to the first person singular conjugation.

So:

Ik moet/Moet ik? vs. Jij moet/Moet jij?

Ik kom/Kom ik? vs. Jij komt/Kom jij?

Ik ga/Ga ik? vs. Jij gaat/Ga jij?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azevedof
azevedof
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Really helpful! Thanks a lot!

2 years ago