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  5. "Mio figlio è grosso."

"Mio figlio è grosso."

Translation:My son is big.

July 31, 2013

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloydo3000

I instinctively wrote "My son is fat" but that is "Mio figlio e' grasso."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/italiaoo

Ah, grasso is the word for "fat". Thank you! I mistook "grosso" for "fat" in another sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lipcseibetti

it accepts "fat" as well, now :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanPaterso

Not for me unfortunately. Fat was rejected


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/santigeno

not for me either..!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

Yes, 'fat' is no longer accepted (nor, actually, should it be).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldjen

I did that too. :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babiole

So "grosso" is "big", "grasso" is "fat", "grande" is "tall"? Can you use "grosso" for "tall" too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuerraAmanda

Isn't "grande" big? I didn't understand the usage of "grosso" e--e


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matt.sjc

Well, "grosso" means big as well, but in the horizontal axis, whereas "alto" is big in the vertical sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hugoxrosa

Can 'grosso' also means 'thick' or 'wide'? Or are there other italian words for these?

So, engineerly, we have: 'alto' for z-axis; 'lungo' for y-axis; 'grosso' for x-axis; 'grande' for all of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

Wait, Isn't The 'Y' Axis Vertical?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiperDeck

"alto" is tall


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NekoSakuraChan

Alto/alta is tall. Grande is used the way we say to a child "you're getting so big". We do not mean the child is expanding (hopefully), we mean they are getting tall. Alto is still the word for tall


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laila.bent

Oh? Because I wrote ''My son is fat'' and it was accepted. It shouldn't have?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloydo3000

I guess not. Unless big is an acceptable euphemism for fat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThinkerXT

As far as I understand grosso is a pejorative term for saying big, yet a euphemism for saying fat, like the French word gros.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Omid891333

What is the difference between grande and grosso


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauricioCasapia

What is the difference between grosso and grande? I already knew tha "grande" = "big", and "alto" = "tall", and "grasso" = "fat"; however it says that grosso is big too....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davetastico

Grosso means Big or Fat;

Grasso means Fat;

Grande means Big.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dosAidos

Well that really sounds bad in Portuguese...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gianpaolo688419

up there with "your mother is large" in the previous section.

There should still be an Insults section for Duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoolStuffYT

I just watched a HP (Harry Potter) movie, and this reminds me of Dudley.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/banananino

I accidentally put "My son is gross"...How to say "gross" in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanZhang44

Lordo means gross in italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

Only in the sense of "gross annual income"! 'Gross' in the sense of 'eew, gross' would be 'disgustoso'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birdfishy

"Gross" can mean "revolting" or "disgusting" (e.g. picking your nose in company -as a mild example) in Australia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanZhang44

I accidentally thought grosso meant gross, so i put my son is gross :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rjjacob

Does this mean my son is big in the sense of having grown up, or in the sense of being larger than normal for his age?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

I think it's the 'larger than normal' sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwlievi13

'My son is gross' - seemed unlikely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilAustiniano

Can't 'grosso' also mean 'grown (up)' in this context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariannR

I've heard 'grande' used to refer to 'grown'. Also 'il più grande' to mean 'the oldest'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DocOx

I wish the sounds were clearer. I, for one, hear "grAsso" rather than "grOsso" (both in normal and slow speed). This is not the first time that I find sounds to be unclear and this is very frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K.Kimberly

I listened twice and also heard grasso.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yordi.carm

In Spanish we have "grueso" that is used to describe people a little fat. Maybe it's kinda the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eltapatio

Not in mexico, we use obeso or gordo or gordito if you like him


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariaelena256

yordi.carm i think grueso also means "thick" in spanish, rite??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DDoeleman

Why can you say 'mio figlio' here in stead of 'il mio figlio'? Can someone explain the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babiole

This is because you don't use the article (il, la, i, le...) before the possessive when it refers to a member of the family: my son, my mother etc. "Il mio gatto" but "mio figlio".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DDoeleman

Ah, I understand. Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack386237

DD, For singular members of the family, son, daughter, husband, wife, grandmother, grandfather etc, you never use an article, but for plurals, like i nonni, you do. JLN


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onntastic

How come its not "Il mio figlio..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilCockling

We do not use the article for family members


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atsocric

I said "my boy is big" and that was incorrect??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

My boy would be translated as il mio ragazzo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Storm74069

I am your son and I find this offensive


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack926964

Duolingo chat is just interesting!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germaron

How are adjective endings determined?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izakayasebu

I mistook Duolingo for a Lannister for a second then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theelox

Why isn't "My son is heavy" accepted? Duolingo says "grosso" can be translated as "heavy."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diane540044

I translated it as " my son is tall" knowing that "alto" would be more specifically "tall". BUT the correction given me said the translation should be "My son is FAT". Wouldn't FAT be GRASSO, rather than GROSSO?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmartinez15

So...grosso is a synonym for pesante,right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2303

Nope, it's almost a synonym for grande, from the German groß; grande is often used with more meanings, e.g. great, grand, and so on, and in some cases one is preferred to the other. When discussing people, grande can mean adult, or noteworthy (e.g. "un gran signore", a true gentleman), while grosso tends to mean tall and well built.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NekoSakuraChan

I thought this meant my son is gross for a second


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack386237

Duo rejected "My child is heavy, " even though it listed child and heavy as translations for figlio and grasso. Frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2303

Grasso means fat, grosso means large: perhaps you could use heavy as a euphemism for fat, but not large. Heavy is pesante or (if immaterial) grave.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaMarGibson

Mio figlio grosso adulto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WalterZAMB4

Why is the figlio not considered to be a 'he/she/it' and so grosso isn't grossa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HiMeCriss

Lmao I put black istead of big from the word bank


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrishMarge

Wouldn't "my son is heavy" also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NekoSakuraChan

No, heavy is a politically correct american term for fat. Grosso means big, as in large.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eltapatio

Gordo o gordito :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laprimavolta

typical american sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielPomp5

In my country we say "groso" meaning "great/amazing" so I wrote "My son is important"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaDolcemascolo

that isn't something to be proud of i would think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguisticPower

what is this german mixed with italian ?

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