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"Ellos regresan a América."

Translation:They return to America.

5 years ago

28 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/Kortaggio
Kortaggio
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I learned that "América" doesn't mean "United States of America" but instead it refers to the continent America. Is this right? I've also heard things like "if you say América, it's assumed that you mean South America".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-montunero
el-montunero
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I would also like to know the same thing. In Europe, as in rest of the world (incl. USA) people normally use word America when reffering to the USA becuse it is shortened. I also heard in various films Mexicans, Colombians and other Latin-American country citizens using Americano when talking about a US citizen. But then again, if you are having a conversation with someone usually you can tell from the context of the story whether the person is speaking about the country or the continent. It is kind of similar to when Europeans say Europe sometimes instead of EU nowadays.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Amigos: I think it is generally accepted that "American" ("Americano") means a citizen of the United States of America, although technically the word is "Estadounidense". There is no good word in English for "estadounidense' so it is difficult to translate; it would be something like "United Statesian". Many latinamericans say "norteamericano" when referring to somebody from USA even though North America includes Mexico and Canada. "America" includes Canada, United States, Mexico, all countries of Central America and South America -- any maybe the Caribbean island countries also(??). Another term many latinamericans use for USA citizens is "gringo" which used to be derogatory, but is just a common term now-a-days in most cases. CHAU

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toggrikk
toggrikk
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I think this differes in different places in Europe. In Sweden, at least in an official setting, you would not say America when you meant the US. The newspapers of record, for example, would not write that. In an colloquial conversation that could perhaps pass. As there are no good way to say "estadounidense", the sentence would be reformulated to say "Persons from the USA" or the like. In a similar vein, it would not be accepted (in a somewhat formal setting) to use "Europe" when speaking about the EU. People would no doubt say that Norway, Switzerland and Iceland are European countries. However, I believe this is also a question of which social groups you are in, both when it comes to the level of education and when it comes to political opinions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

Also many Europeans don't like it when the term Europe is being used to mean EU. Somehow it renders the Swiss (and others) non-European and even many people in the EU countries do not like Europe and EU being used synonymously. It is not that big a deal though and nobody is likely to be offended by that or anything. I think it is the same is probably true of most Americans (in the context of using the name America for the US). Of course, if someone clearly dislikes it, there is no reason to be a dick and use that term when speaking to him.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-montunero
el-montunero
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Sure, it's just that it is much easier to say "American" instead of "citizen of the United States" all the time in the conversation, since they don't really have a one-word-name for themselves. :)

Also - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States

Anyways, USA is the only American country that actually has the word "America" in it, so I guess they've earned the right to use "Americans" as a nickname. Also, if you look the history of the USA, they were also calling themselves Americans (as in, not British, but American, on American soil). So if you ask me (even though I'm not American), I would just say - why not?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garrixon

"Yankee" is probably as good as you're going to get. Although in the South it means Northerner and in the North it means New Englander and in New England it means New York baseball player...yeah, American will have to do.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theRealRabbit

Exactly. We do have a one-word name for ourselves, btw ;) But anyway, the 'Americas' were also called Colombia, but we don't have a problem calling only Colombians Colombians. Also, America is an Italian-derived word, and you're right, we fought two extremely bloody wars in our country to forever make us "Americans", and define that term. No one else has the word in their country (as you pointed out), but the North Americans in the estados unidos de Mexíco sure do have "US" in theirs.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theRealRabbit

No, it's incorrect, Bill Mei. Correct them, because it's ignorant. Just as you'll often hear yourself (and Koreans and Japanese people) referred to as "chino", whether you are or not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amartya1511

Can I write: Ellos vuelven a AmErica?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LewisH65
LewisH65
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On volver vs. regresar from spanishdict.com:

''Volver and regresar both mean "to return," in the sense of "return from a place." An added feature is that volver(se) in the reflexive form means "to become." For example: When she heard the news she became crazed. Cuando ella oyó la noticia se volvió loca. I guess the other thing to recall is that "volver" is a stem changing verb in the present tense (o-ue) and "regresar" is a regular "ar" verb.'

'Good to know on the "Volver (se)." Is there a time to use volver and a time to use regresar or are they interchangable? Thanks for your help!'

'You can use either one at your discretion! ''

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guillembb
guillembb
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Definitely, yes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carla.lazzari
carla.lazzari
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Would "they come back to America" also be correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mdcooper
mdcooper
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I put this in and got it wrong, so I´m wondering the same thing. And, is that also the case for "volver"? Would one be used for one perspective (someone in Europe, for example, who would say "go back") and one for the other (someone in America who would say "come back").

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/happyasaclam

I wrote, "They are going back to America," which I think sounds more natural than what they have.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thasvaddef
Thasvaddef
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Is the a silent when the next word starts with a?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/senoratrevino

Would "they are returning to America" also be correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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yes

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zemoer

i entered exactly that, and lost a heart

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jbauer1414
Jbauer1414
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wouldn't that be "Ellos están regresando a America?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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Then report it. It definitely belongs in the correct solutions list.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amartya1511

Well, I think that'd be Ellos/Ellas estAn regresando a AmErica. Not sure abt it though. But unlike french, spanish has a different way of expressing present continuos tense. So...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichelinePicard

Why "come back" was marked wrong? I don't really understand the difference? DL suggests "go back" or "return". I think come back is better than go back! What do you think?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mdcooper
mdcooper
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I responded above to someone but had the same experience! I wonder if there is a slight difference in volver and regresar - one meaning go back and one meaning come back - based on the perspective of who is speaking and where the subject is going/coming back to (ex. the speaker and subj both in America, or the speaker in Europe and subj. in America)

Any native Spanish speakers want to weigh in?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabenpor
jabenpor
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in this sentence volver and regresar are both synonym. In other cases volver can be translated as change, turn, beguin again but when you want to say to return to the initial point you can use regresar or volver indistinctly

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-montunero
el-montunero
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Why not "a la (América)" instead of "a"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guillembb
guillembb
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Some countries are preceded by the article, like "la India" or "el Reino Unido", but the list is quite limited. See http://usoadecuadodelalenguaescrita.blogspot.com/2009/01/paises-con-articulo.html ("América" is not one of them).

From that list, some of the articles tend to disappear (el Japón).

For the ones that have a strong tradition and tend to remain, their use is recommended but, as far as I know, not mandatory.

So my advice would be that, when in doubt, don't use the article.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gitanomama

They are returning to America. Sounds more like common usage.

4 years ago