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"My parents went to leave my uncle at the airport."

Translation:Mis padres fueron a dejar a mi tío al aeropuerto.

5 years ago

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Anybody else think that sounds strange? sounds like they dumped him at the airport then ran off before he could follow them back home... I'd have thought a better translation would be "took my uncle to the airport"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Yes, American English would use verb, "to take" or maybe "to drop" in this sentence. It's awkward as translated. I don't "leave" people at the airport, but I may leave my cell phone at TSA by mistake. And in my life, I have dropped many people at the airport. Por ejemplo: I have an early flight. Can you drop me at the airport?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH

This native New Englander would say "to leave". Because you know Uncle will be at the airport a good long time after they drop him off and before he flies.

It does sound like someone explaining why their parents aren't home, though -- explaining their absence, rather than just saying "my parents dropped Uncle off at the airport." Because "went to leave" indicates something about how long they'll be gone.

"Where are are your parents?" "They went to leave my uncle at the airport."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carlyn.
Carlyn.
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I feel like you're playing devil's advocate, no? I have never heard an English speaker say they left someone at the airport unless it was an accident that they left him there. Even in your example at one point you say "dropped off," which is far more common.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super_Duo_Lingo
Super_Duo_Lingo
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I guess, that the phrase in English was constructed in a strange way. I hope this never happens in real life :)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natashareidnine

"They went to leave my uncle at the airport" sounds very strange to me as an American. I would say, "They went to take my uncle to the airport."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreebirdRising

No way - totally not likely for a person. We would say "to drop him off at" if you're talking about future tense. Maybe "left" if speaking past tense, but even that would be odd and suggests a specific connotation, probably negative.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DABurnside
DABurnside
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I think "leaving" carries a particular nuance that doesn't exist with the more common expressions. It suggests feeling like you're abandoning Uncle--he's intimidated by air travel, or he didn't want to go, or he's going to his brother's funeral and you've left him alone with his grief, or there is a many-hours-long wait on the other side of security. Leaving suggest regret, sadness, possibly guilt. I agree that we normally don't say that. More to the point, do hispanohablantes typically use dejar this way? One of Dejar's meanings is "drop." It's kind of far down the list of meanings, though.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crondogz
Crondogz
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British English would also use 'to take' or 'to drop (off)'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tim555
tim555
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The 'a' after dejar is confusing me here

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Tim: It's called the "personal a" and is used in front of a direct object which is a person or a pet; it's placed after the verb. More examples: Conozco a su hermana Elena. (I know your sister Elena.) ?Conoce Ud. a Senor Robert Gomez? (Do you know Mr. Robert Gomez?) Llamo al medico. (I'm calling the doctor.) It has been thoroughly discussed on DL, and you can find a complete explanation at Internet grammar sites. I hope this quick answer helps you.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CynDaVaz

Yes, that almost always trips me up. I keep forgetting when, exactly, to put it. Argh!!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ogniloud1

Me too double argh!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tim555
tim555
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Gracias por su respuesta, I understand it now, kind of :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The confusion starts when you have indirect objects introduced by the preposition "a". Por ejemplo: Le hablo a Carlos (I am speaking to Carlos) Les escribo a mis amigos (I wrote to my friends) Le compro un regalo a Ana (I am buying a gift for Ana). In these sentences, you MUST include the indirect object pronoun (LE/LES) because it is required with sentences that have indirect objects which are people/pets (to Carlos; to my friends; for Ana).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimmieangel323

Gracias. Your explanation helps a lot!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natashareidnine

I find it very strange and it throws me off. A literal English translation would be, "I know at your sister Elena."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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That's why personal a's are never translated.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rdelbian

Salir refers to people leaving... I am leaving now. Dejar refers to something or someone that was left behind so to speak. I leave my spare key under the mat.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glen1.macdonald

Thanks -- the distinction is clear now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StacyBursuk

The "a" before "dejar" is confusing me because doesn't "dejar" already mean "to leave?" Why would I need to say "to to leave?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Only guessing, but I think the 'a' before dejar is actually AFTER fueron - so it's "went TO do X". Using dejar in the infinitive like that is just an example of the way spanish uses the infinitive... like when you use "ver a" before the infintitive when you mean "going to DO X". You can't always translate the infinitive directly into "to DO X" in english... though often you can :-)

Not sure if that made sense - I knew what I meant but it's come out a bit confusing :-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

stacy- after the verb to go/ir, always the preposition A. Voy a invitar a mi amigo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marge54
marge54
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"dejar" in this contexte is not proper. Normally "llevar" fits better = "mis padres fueron a llevar a mi tio al aeropuerto". Then DL must accept this translation !

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.Doc.

Once again, I totally love the other translation options for this question; the 3 options were:

  1. Mis padres fueron a comer a mi tío al aeropuerto.
  2. Mis padres fueron a dejar a mi tío al aeropuerto.
  3. Mis padres fueron a comer a mi tío en el aeropuerto.

The translations of those are:

  1. My parents went to eat my uncle at the airport.
  2. My parents went to leave my uncle at the airport.
  3. My parents went to eat my uncle at the airport.

Pretty obvious which one is right...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ivanyeo
ivanyeo
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I don't think anyone asked this, but this puzzles me. Why is it 'dejar a mi tio al aeropuerto' and not 'dejar a mi tio en el aeropuerto'? Or would it work as well?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

ivany- it implies a movement, that's why. I'm going al restaurante and not in the restaurant.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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Yes, "en el aeropuerto" is accepted as well. It's not saying "going to the airport" but rather "going to do something at the airport."

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlishaThom4

Horrible English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natashareidnine

The "report a problem" function isn't working, so I'll report it here. This English sentence is unnatural. In English one would say, "My parents left to drop my uncle off at the airport," or "My parents left to take my uncle to the airport." I don't think the administrators pay any attention to the "report a problem" replies, because I already reported this sentence many months ago.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

One way to get rid of the crazy uncle!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

This is how I rememeber "dejar". Its nerdy and convoluted but it works for me.
"Dejar" is related etymologically to the Spanish verb "laxar", which means to loosen (as in "lax" or "ExLax"). It is even more closely related to Spanish verb "alejar" which means to "remove to a distance, put further a way". Aha! I say and I remember the word "lejos" which means "far away". So "dejar" has the sense of putting something in the distance ("dar a lo lejos"), leaving it behind, letting go ("de-laxing" the laces).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glen1.macdonald

The difference between salir and dejar isn't clear to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nadiawolfg

Salir is to leave a place. To exit. Dejar is to leave something or someone behind.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christiahlove

Why the "a" before the "mi tío?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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It's the "personal a". When referring to people or pets you need an a after the verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamilah995663

Estoy de acuerdo. Este particular frase es extraño.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

This is an American turn of phrase. I would say 'took him to the airport'...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I would say "drop him at the airport."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super_Duo_Lingo
Super_Duo_Lingo
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To me the English phrase sounds like the evil parents left the poor uncle to his own devices at the airport against his will. In addition, the word 'tío' in Spanish does not always mean 'uncle'.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nosphaer

I think "Mis padres fueron para dejar a mi tío al aeropuerto" should also be correct because both "a" and "para" functionally satisfy the English translation. That is a fact.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salsabandit

why not, "para dejar a mi tio"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/472426

I agree: para + infinitive 'for to leave' -- i await to be corrected!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lifeseyephoto

That's a while lot of "to". To leave to my uncle to the airport.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

Having a hard timing figuring out when to use "que" and when to us "a"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/briannaeason

I read this as "My parents WANT to leave my uncle at the airport"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeLanzarote

Why is it al and not just el? A was used for tío so why is it used again

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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'A' before 'tío' is the personal a used after the verb when people or pets are the direct object. 'A' with 'el aeropuerto' (=al aeropuerto) means "to the airport".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vin273616

I feel like that sentence means that they are leaving their uncle behind, which sounds quite strange.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

you should never say you went to leave someone at the airport, this is bad english. instead, say that you went to drop off your uncle at the airport, that would convey the message of you assisting him to his flight, otherwise it sounds like you literally getting rid of him by means of dumping his there and then taking off quickly without caring what happened to him there.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/franklinkowalski

Why "al aeropuerto" instead of "en el aeropuerto" ?

1 month ago