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"Tú habías venido de la ciudad."

Translation:You had come from the city.

5 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Suziemalt

why is 'arrived ' wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Spanish (and Duo) can be fussy about venir/llegar and arrive/come. You arrive at a place and come from a place.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CNyE
CNyE
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I tripped up on that one too. It makes sense in English to say You had arrived from... One of those things you have to memorize!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mloverfelt

Arrived works now

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyDannyDanny

How you do you say "you had come TO the city" It seems like that's what this meant, but It's "from" the city. :-/

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zygiella

"Tu habías venido/llegado a la ciudad". "a" means "to" and "de" means "from".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It is colloquial Spanish to use "a" when English would use "in," so I always like to use "into" to translate the word "a" in "Tú habías venido a la cuidad." (You have come into the city.)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleatkilty

I always make the mistake of "de" being "to". The best trick for me is to translate "de" generally as "of", and "you had come of the city" would obviously be "from" but not "to".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaiylap

It's in the imperfect because it is 'setting the scene', describing something that was happening around the thing that did happen. Clear, hey? e.g. I had just finished my homework when all the lights went off.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TalGelman-

What's the difference between past perfect and present perfect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
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Tal, If you are looking for examples: He hablado = I have spoken. Había hablado = I had spoken. Past perfect is further back than present perfect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brisance

Not trying to be snarky, but in this case, wouldn't the translation not be past perfect since the past tense of "come" is "came"? i.e. "You had came from the city"? But this sounds odd for English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aristotlefan

It's the "had" that makes it past perfect. Present perfect would be "has come." "Had came" sounds odd because it's not correct English grammar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zeunysos

English tenses with perfective aspect all use the same past participle of the verb. We clarify which specific tense it is by modifying the auxiliary verb "to have".

"Came" is the preterite (simple past) tense of "to come", not a participle. The past participle of "to come" is "come". So simple past is "he came", but perfective is "he had come/he has come/he will have come" (past/present/future perfects).

Compare with "I saw it": "I had seen/I have seen/I will have seen it". We'd never say "I have saw it". Hope that helps!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/borismrodriguez

Perfect (aka compound) tenses, both in English and Spanish, are constructed as "helping verb + past participle". For comparison, "broke" is the past-tense of "to break", but you wouldn't say "I had broke the TV". Instead, you use the past participle "broken", i.e. "I had broken the TV".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

English has a PRESENT Perfect tense that uses "have" + the past participle, and also has a PAST Perfect tense that uses "haD" + the past participle.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/izabelbaker

"You had come from the town" this sentence was considered incorrect. I wonder why.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caversham
Caversham
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Duo prefers pueblo for town

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catskul

Why "de" here instead of "desde"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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Desde is a bit more precise, because it has fewer meanings and works in fewer situations, but both work here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Desde" can mean "since."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eaarthman

why are we using the imperfect tense (habías) here, instead of the preterite (hubiste)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

See kaiylap's comment above.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David_AAA
David_AAA
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Yet again why is "town" wrong? In the UK we hardly ever use "city"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

See Caversham's comment above.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bryn1953
bryn1953
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You had come to the city is wrong where does the from come from in the model answer, I thought habias venido is the past perfect of venir which is to come

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

"de" is from.

Soy de Argentina - I am from Argentina.

To the city would be "a la ciudad"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Habías = had.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ymeagain
Ymeagain
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I misheard this as 'Tú habías venido ver la cuidad' . Is that construction allowed?

2 years ago