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"Je vais prendre un bain."

Translation:I am going to take a bath.

5 years ago

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tondzino

I think that both versions: to have a bath and to take a bath should be accepted. I know that more accurate translation is to have a bath (the same occurred with shower here on duolingo) It is just a matter whether you use British/American english. Do you agree?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickRed
PatrickRed
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I agree that 'to have a bath' should be accepted, as there are other instances in which you would translate prendre in this way. For example, when ordering a coffee in a restaurant 'je vais prendre un café' would become 'I'll have a coffee'. As a Canadian English speaker I would say 'to have a bath' is more commonly used than 'to take a bath'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Yep. To this Canadian, taking a bath sound more like stealing a plumbing fixture.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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Yes. We still say "take" a bath in UK, but it is rarer. Said mostly by the privately educated, I think.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
feyMorgaina
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As a native Torontonian, I probably say "have a bath" and "take a bath" interchangeably. I've never really thought about it much, but maybe in the future I'll track when I use it.

For example, maybe I say "I'm going to have a bath now" just before I get ready for one (though I'm fairly certain I've said "I'm going to take a bath now"); and maybe I say "I'm taking a bath" when I'm already in the bath (I'm not sure I say "I'm having a bath" in this context). (I grew up in a big family, and if you were in the bathroom too long, eventually someone would be knocking on the door.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jude484365
Jude484365
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Totally. I'm Australian and we 'have' a bath. To take a bath is to steal it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arya.Stark

is it just me or does this really sound like "je veux" instead of "je vais"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VEddie

Veux = Vho-o

Vais = Vhe-e

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KovacsGy

I think the question is not about how it should sound, but how it actually sounded in the audio. The previous question I got was "Je veux un bain", so the two were very close in time, and I couldn't hear any difference. I think because the audio wasn't clear at all, so I'll probably report that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arya.Stark

I can't understand your phonetic guide...but I thought I was pretty familiar with how they should both sound, but in this audio it really sounds like 'ais' is being schwa'd instead.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VEddie

I'm not too familiar with english voices, so I did my best on trying to explain how I can differentiate it.

If you know Spanish, I can explain it easier, then again, you're free to check out both verbs in google and listen to the audio plenty of times. I'm sorry I couldn't help that much though.

In short, Veux sounds like VUH and Vais sounds like VEH following my little "guide"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelChoo

why not I am going to take a shower? should it be accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Douche = shower. Bain = bath. "Je vais prendre une douche".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PedroEsperidiao
PedroEsperidiao
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But what exactly is the difference?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel665464

Douche=Shower=you stand straight and the water falls on your head. Bain=Bath=you sit down in the bath, play with your yellow duck and blow bubbles.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BizzLizz
BizzLizz
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'I am going to bathe' was marked incorrect. :-(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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And for me. Make sure you report it --- OFTEN.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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But is "I am going to take a bath" really interchangeable with "I am going to bathe"? I don't think they're close enough to warrant the latter's inclusion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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According to the dictionary at http://www.wordreference.com/enfr/bathe, "bathe" is prendre un bain. That's good enough for me and DL should accept it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Actually, it's only one out of five definitions. If they were equally weighted (which they're not) you'd have a 1:5 chance of being right.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I don't get your argument, CJD. If there are five definitions for "prendre un bain" then there are five possible translations. Without context any of them should be accepted by DL. We're not mind-readers.

Incidentally, which dictionary are you reading? WordReference has three definitions:
prendre un bain is "have a bath" or "take a bath",
and "bathe" is prendre un bain.
("bathe" can also be "se baigner" as in swimming).
Are there some other meanings I have missed?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaphaelleXXIV

I think it's because it wants you to use the noun. "Bath" = noun, "bathe" = verb. And I believe there is no exact verb version for bath in French.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandiSiek

How do you pronounce bain? I can't seem to hear it good, and it's even worse on google translate. Does it sound more like Bah? Bon? Something else? Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rusted.tree

It's pronounced like "ba-uhn". This isn't really a sound we make in English, so you might need to work your way towards it. It's easier to get the right pronunciation if you start with two syllables and shorten until it sounds like one.

  1. Say "bah", like in "bah humbug".
  2. Say "un", like the French "one". There's almost no "n" sound, except that the word gets a little more nasal at the end. Try saying "uh", but with your tongue close to the roof of your mouth.
  3. Say these two closer and closer together until you have one syllable. If I tried to spell it, it might be something like "beh(n)".
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Here's a link. Click on the speaker icon to hear the word pronounced. http://www.larousse.com/en/dictionaries/french-english/bain/7489

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/curlyeric
curlyeric
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I hear something between Bah and Bu, totally different from the sound of bon. Even if it was identical "I am going to take a good" doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-TashaJ-

I think it's pronounced something like "Ban" although I'm not entirely sure if you pronounce the 'n'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fr0sch
Fr0sch
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Say "un" as 1. (as when counting 1,2,3 etc.) but with "B" in front.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-TashaJ-

Okay, thanks :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Wrong! Listen to real speakers on Forvo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gori16

So how is "baignoire" and "bain" different?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/curlyeric
curlyeric
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La baignoire is specifically "bathtub". Je nettoie la baignoire. Le bain is "bath" and has a number of idiomatic uses as well "bain de bouche" mouthwash / "bain de vapeur" steam bath. Je prends un bain dans la baignore.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cockatiel321

DL is so confusing, I heard "je vais prendre en vent". And I just lost my last heart! :(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Maybe you should update your app. Duolingo hasn't used hearts for ages!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cockatiel321

Oh thx, but I meant for the tests

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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You've got me curious now. Which tests are those? I've obviously never seen them!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cockatiel321

Its when you test out of a couple of skills if you already know them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oxolalpa
oxolalpa
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Can this be takes also as "take a shower" or "hit the shower"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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« bain », « douche » and « se laver » are all different, as are "bath", "shower" and "to wash (oneself)".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Killermise

Can this also mean 'I will take a bath'?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VikingBoat
VikingBoat
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I am going to take a bath

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Yes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VikingBoat
VikingBoat
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But it says "I go to take a bath"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

In French, the verb "aller" + an infinitive = the near future. It indicates something that is about to happen. In English, we can express this just as the future - "I will take a bath" - but more usually we say "I am going to take a bath". We don't normally say, "I go to take a bath".

http://french.about.com/od/grammar/g/nearfuture.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YuanYiyang
YuanYiyang
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What's wrong with "I will bathe"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0radka0

What's wrong with "I'm gonna"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Too slangy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Untied_Knots

what about douche?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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« douche » means "shower".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamMurr3

To me even the slow voice sounded more like "vin" than "bain"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelodyCrafer

I was hoping someone might have said 'But where are you going to take it' ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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  • I feel like a bath
  • That's funny, you don't look like a bath!
  • I mean, I'm going to take a bath.
  • Where are you going to take it?
  • I mean I'm going to have a bath... oh forget it!
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ERGCmcnabb6

Shouldn't "I am going bathing" be accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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That would be something like « J'y vais pour me baigner » "to bathe" is a reflexive verb: « se baigner ».

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ERGCmcnabb6

Thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beverley658631

In English we "have a bath" ! If you take something, you pick it up and take it somewhere!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankie100828

Where?

1 week ago