"Do you have strings?"

Translation:Har ni snören?

January 19, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Qrren

shouldn't most ett- words remain the same in plural form, and only take an "n" at the end when it is definitive plural? Why is it "snören" instead of "snöre" here?

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

It's ett-words ending in a consonant that virtually always stay the same in the plural. :)

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Qrren

I see! Thanks so much for the super fast reply! :)

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mimomiar

So there is never a distinction between the definite and indefinite plural of snöre?

December 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/historicbruno

There is. According to my notes, this is the so-called "fourth declension" in Swedish: ett-words ending in a vowel. The indefinite plural form adds an "-n" (snören), while the definite plural form adds "-na" (snörena). They occur much less frequently in the lessons than ett-words ending in consonants (the "fifth declension"), which are unchanged in indefinite plural, but add "-en" in definite plural form. As a result, I still forget about this distinction :-)

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Cydco
  • 1602

Does snören also apply to instrument strings?

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

No, those are strängar in Swedish. (en sträng).

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Cydco
  • 1602

Tack!

December 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/brtjky

what about this answer: "har du/ni några snören?", like in "Do you have any ...?"

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LeePassmore

When would this be used? Strings as a plural is uncommon unless used for instruments. Even if you wanted several pieces of string, you would still say 'do you have (any) string'

December 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/historicbruno

I think it depends heavily on context. You might not ask someone randomly if they had "strings", but perhaps you are discussing a craft project which clearly calls for multiple types of string, instead of one long string to be cut into multiple pieces.

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MikkoVedru

I don't understand what this sentence means. Can somebody explain the context and what kind of strings we are talking about?

January 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/pradio

I'm quite surprised too, that they're talking bout strings all the time. But maybe Duolingo want to stress that Swedish are just a mighty nation of melodic death metal and they just break their strings quite often so they ask this kind of questions instead of "have you seen my wallet/keyes/cell/glasses"?

January 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

That's a sträng, and the default is snöre, which is the "twine" sense of "string". :)

January 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bynny2015

How would you say, "No strings attached."

May 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

There honestly isn't really a single good translation of that. We don't have the phrase in the same way English does. So it depends on the context, and we usually phrase it a bit more directly.

May 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/qiwiteque

Tråd was not accepted as an answer which means a string or a thread. Without a context this is a bit ambiguous.

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Since it's strings, it would have to be trådar, but that should be accepted.

January 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Valentina850

But why do we need the definite form "snören" here, instead of "snör"?

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/historicbruno

Please see the above discussion. Different rules apply because snöre is an ett-word ending in a vowel.

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NatalieBoa3

Like äpple, right?

April 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Yep.

April 9, 2019
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