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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBorkBorkBork

Pronunciation of stjärnorna in a song

In the song Fråga stjärnorna, Cajsastina Åkerström is pronouncing stjärnorna differently than I've heard elsewhere. Is it only a matter of variations in the pronunciation of the sj-sound? Or is there something different happening here?

January 19, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

While you're at it, why don't you listen to this classical Swedish pop song about stars as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-02uHyU-rjs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DogePamyuPamyu

... Swedish what even though? How is Stjärnorna pronounced like farnaornar?

I was under the impression that stj was like that hyw sound... http://youtu.be/vHe7f_L7S2Q?t=5m17s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

Cajstastina's pronunciation sounds like the Standard Swedish pronunciation to me as well. There are actually (at least) three ways to pronounce the sje-sound and the girl in your video seems to use the one which is close to the German ach-laut.

The third one is to pronounce "sj" like the English "sh"-sound and is used mainly in Northern Sweden. Personally, I think this is the most beautiful pronunciation, if you are from the northern parts that is, else it could sound fake or unnatural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

CajsaStina sounds right to me. Perhaps a little weakly pronounced. I'd think it's a matter of training your ears to get it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DogePamyuPamyu

Do you know if there's a reason why Swedish people thought it would be a good idea to pronounced "skj" as "hwy" when they were developing their language? The pronunciation confuses me so much lol.

I wonder why it isn't closer to German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

It has to do with sound changes over the last five hundred years. The spellings were, hundreds of years ago, actually pronounced the way they're spelled. Over time, many of these consonant clusters (and K before soft vowels) changed into the sje and tje sounds of today.

In 1906 the Swedish language went through a spelling reform, but it dealt primarily with spelling V and T, abolishing hv/fv/dt spellings. The countless ways the Swedish language of today uses to spell the sje and tje is the woe of many of those who try to learn the language, and even native schoolchildren have to spend time learning the respective spellings of words.

Curiously, up until the second world war, there was a small but notable Swedish-speaking minority in western Estonia, whose Swedish had not gone through all these changes. Consequently they still pronounced TJ as /tj/ for example. After WW2 though, these Swedes were expelled and today only a few hundred remain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DogePamyuPamyu

Thanks for that info! Makes sense now. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBorkBorkBork

I'm used to hearing much more of a velar fricative sound (which I do still hear in Cajsastina's pronunciation) but no labial fricative, like in DogePamyuPamyu's video.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

There is considerable variation how it’s pronounced. For me it’s a labialised velar fricative, but it might not be the same for everyone. Before back vowels it’s sometimes just a velar fricative where I’m from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

I was referring to the link in the threadstarter post, perhaps I was a bit unclear. Will edit that in.

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