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"Pasta is geen fruit."

Translation:Pasta is not fruit.

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/IchBinKarl1

I thought it said pasta is green fruit...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skyetist

My life has been a lie! D:

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oozunlu

Why is it not "pasta is niet fruit"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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https://www.duolingo.com/NerysGhemor

Am I correct that it largely functions like German "kein" and "nicht"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Yes, that's right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flynn_nugg

Really?! But then what food is it?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jehra2

an essential, that's what

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/d00t

Wait... it isn't?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RileyR24

How would you say "pasta is not a fruit"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Same way. "geen" can be thought of as the negative form of the indefinite article.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerrynkaPe

i have question: how can i say that cat is not dog? De kat is geen de hond or Kat is geen hond?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StefvanSchie
StefvanSchie
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'De kat is geen hond', would be the best translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerrynkaPe

Dank je! :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reign869188

Who comes up with these sentences?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ngsihiu

Well, is the r like the Spanish r or the German r? I feel Spanish r when it says "fruit" and "bord", and German r when it says "rijst" and "brood". This is when I'd really like a lessen on alphabet :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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The Spanish "r" is the alveolar trill. The Dutch "r" is the velar/uvular fricative.

http://www.ipachart.com/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/colfin_96
colfin_96
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Haha if you listen to the IPA pronounctians too often it makes you laugh :D However it was very helpful - thanks :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidvdb
davidvdb
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You can choose, actually! What you think is easier for you. Some speakers use a Spanish-like R, but shorter. Otherwise, you'll hear a German-like R, also less hard and shorter.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soulphish

I can't roll my r's at all, will that effect other peoples understand of me? For instance, will there be words that change depending on how the r is pronounced?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidvdb
davidvdb
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The pronunciation of R varies considerably from dialect to dialect and even between speakers in the same dialect area:

  • An alveolar trill [r], with the alveolar tap [ɾ] as a common allophone. (aka Spanish R)
  • The uvular trill [ʀ], found particularly in the central and southern dialect areas. Syllable-finally, it may be debuccalized to [ɐ], much as in German. This is more common in the (south)eastern areas (Limburg, southeast Brabantian, Overijssel). (aka German R)
  • The coastal dialects of South Holland produce a voiced uvular fricative [ʁ] (aka French R), which causes it to merge with a uvular /ɣ/ and (if devoicing occurs) with /x/. In these dialects, schijven ('discs') and schrijven ('to write') are homophones.
  • The retroflex approximant [ɻ] or "bunched approximant" is found at the end of a syllable by some speakers in the Netherlands, especially those from the Randstad, but not in Belgium. Its use has been increasing in recent years. In the Leiden dialect it is used everywhere in a word. (+- English R)

[For more, click me :)]

Conclusion: Don't worry if you can't roll your r's. Try the German or French one instead, if that's easier for you. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StefvanSchie
StefvanSchie
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I know someone (Dutch person) who can't roll his r's either, and I have no problem understanding him at all. I don't roll my r's always either, so I don't think you have to worry about it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arturo_Z
Arturo_Z
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I have been lied to...

8 months ago