Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Ik heb de mooie straten en gebouwen van dit kleine dorp gefilmd."

Translation:I have filmed the beautiful streets and buildings of this little village.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/plasma991

And these types of sentences are why live translating Dutch is difficult... you have to wait till the very end to get the verb. :p

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcarlosmjr
jcarlosmjr
  • 25
  • 19
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 4
  • 3

Dutch sentences can be quite a thriller sometimes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 122

And this is not even an extreme example... But I guess it's still easier than English to French and vice versa. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AceySmith

Do tell... what's so difficult about going from English to French?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 122

The word order is different. In French adjectives usually come after the noun, in English before the noun: a smart boy = un garçon intelligent. I imagine this can be tricky when there are multiple adjectives.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeKurniawan92

That's relative, some non-English languages have the same syntax with French

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 5
  • 175

J'ai filmé les belles rues et bâtiments de ce petit village.

Dat lijkt eenvoudig genoeg.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shore01
Shore01
  • 25
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 6
  • 3
  • 91

It would seem as if there is not a direct Dutch translation of 'town'?

  • city = stad;
  • town = stadje (gemeente? / plaats?/dorp?);
  • village = dorp / plaats
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joelson00

According to van Dale, a town is 'stad' or 'gemeente'. Among the different languages, it is quite difficult to determine the difference between a city and a town, so in Dutch you do best with 'stad' for city and town and 'dorp' for village. In the Netherlands a 'stad' has a population of at least 50'000 (according to Wikipedia), but Belgium does not seem to have this limitation. Germany and France demand a population of only 2000 (Austria: 5000), but in English I would call these towns and not cities. Switzerland, Spain, Italy and Great Britain demand 10'000 inhabitants. 'Gemeente' can mean district, borough, city, town and parish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shore01
Shore01
  • 25
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 6
  • 3
  • 91

Thanks for explanation and the effort, but the distinction in Dutch remains foggy for 'town' and 'village' - I suppose I shouldn't push the point too hard; Afrikaans is similarly vague: village = dorp; town = stad, dorp; and city= stad. I wonder if English has a clear distinction between a 'town' and a 'village'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosPedroPa

English speakers please, "i have something filmed" is incorrect? Yes, Duolingo does love "extreme" examples. Unfortunatelly!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leth_marc
leth_marc
  • 25
  • 19
  • 13
  • 3
  • 23

Yes, "I have something filmed" is incorrect English. "have filmed" is the verb, and stays together before the object.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KGodel

Is "I have shot [...]" correct in this context, or do we need to say "I have filmed [...]"?

2 years ago