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"Boeken zijn geen eten!"

Translation:Books are not food!

3 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vhamui

Yes they are!!!! Books are food for the soul! En Ik ben een banaan!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Voedsel voor de geest inderdaad! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
JewishPolyglot
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Mmm... Lekker

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zero_Lingo
Zero_Lingo
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Ja!!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pippings

Yeah, my first reaction was, "Haha, but I disagree."

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AudreyMDalton

Ah duolingo, teaching me important life lessons as well as a language

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/India0110

But they try to tell me that I'm no banana! :c

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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...unless you're a bookworm.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma

I'm confusing the difference between eten - to eat eten - food.

How can you tell the difference?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sirnuke
sirnuke
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Context, and how it's used in a sentence. In this sentence, it wouldn't make sense for it to be a verb. I think most languages have at least a few words that can be used as a verb and a noun without any change in spelling or prounciation.

"The chain has oil" versus "Did you oil the chain?" Spanish has cocina, which means kitchen or he/she/you cook.

Cocina* not cocina.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vhamui

Native spanish speaker here! Cocina*

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ister14
Ister14
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Just like fly in English. Fly flies while flies fly.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I have just begun the Dutch course, but I am flying through the early sections because I speak both English and German. But when I got to this question my first Impulse was to translate it as Books are not to be eaten. Now I know that that is passive voice which won't be covered for quite some time, but my point is sometkmes if words have related meanings you get the gyst early on without actually getting the right translation. And as you gain more experience you don't even think about it. Just look up the English word fair. There are many, quite diverse, meanings. But when was the last time you were confused by a native speakers use of that word and choose the wrong meaning.?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/candelarcita

Zijn is always are, correct? And is = is

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xamaranth

Zijn can also mean "his" or "its".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulinaMadero
PaulinaMadero
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They're delicioussss, what are you talking about?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aardappelklomp

Books are friends, not food.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeteUelkue

Isn't eten's mean food and meal?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/naadya80
naadya80
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No Food: eten Meal: maaltijd I may have mispelled though... it's in the food lesson

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crazy_gnome

Why not Boeken zijn niet eten? Or are they both technically correct, with "geen eten" being more gramatically accurate?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sirnuke
sirnuke
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geen is used to negate nouns. Het is niet groot vs het is geen olifant.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gregnacu
gregnacu
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Ah, what a brilliant observation. Thank you. It's much like how in english you can say, "That's no moon!" (As Han Solo did about the Deathstar.) In this case "no" is working like "geen", negating a noun. But you cannot say, "That's no red!", you have to say "That's not red!", in this case not is like "niet." The only difference I'd say is that in English we can also use "not" for nouns, as long as you use an article. Aka, "That's not a moon!" is correct in English. Whereas, I assume, "Dat is niet een maan" is not correct in Dutch. Or... is it?

(Update: sudden rush of brain to the head: Perhaps "Dat is niet een maan" is correct, but it means, that is not one moon, but it might be two moons.) ??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoviThrees
RoviThrees
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That's something you would say to your Dutch dog

9 months ago

[deactivated user]

    Important life lessons with Duo.

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/danieltventer

    Is "books are not edible" not correct?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
    El2theK
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    The Dutch sentence says that books are not food, you could say that makes them not edible (which is open for debate), but to say that the Dutch sentence would be Boeken zijn niet eetbaar.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe843989

    how would you remember the difference between eten(food) and eten(eat), or would you just have to have common sense, like in this sentence

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/sirnuke
    sirnuke
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    English has plenty of examples of words that can be used as different parts of speech without any change in pronunciation or spelling. To paraphrase an example from my Twitter timeline: "We do not object to the object."

    In this case, you'd know that eten means food(noun) because it's preceded with 'geen', which can be (partially) thought of as "not a".

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/gregnacu
    gregnacu
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    Hm. I made a mistake on this one too. My understanding is that verbs ending with -en is also the infinitive form. So I translated it as: Books are not to eat! This makes good english sense to me. Would there be another way of saying that in Dutch?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MalianMe

    I understood from the lesson notes that short vowels are to be kept short. Shouldn't it be "Boekken", then? Or does this only apply to single vowels?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Adrian53542
    Adrian53542
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    It's 'boeken' becomes 'oe' doesn't have both a long and short pronunciation in Dutch. It's always a short [u].

    1 week ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/WayneConwa
    WayneConwa
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    what is wrong with books are not eaten?

    1 year ago