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"Hace trece días"

Translation:Thirteen days ago

5 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

Try thinking of hace + <time period> as <time period> ago. hace tres años -> 3 years ago hace mucho [tiempo] -> a long time ago

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cathykirby

Did not know this! Tus ejemplos son útiles también.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gmartins

"it's been thirteen days" - not accepted??

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GC1998
GC1998
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The word 'hace' before a number of days (or time phrase) means 'ago'.

Hace trece días - 13 days ago.

Hace un mes - A month ago.

It is something that you just have to get used to.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/casmar1234

Thank you GC for telling us we just have to accept it as im the type to scour the Internet to find an explanation. In my learning, 'hace' meant to make or to do is why. Gracias otra vece x

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2689327396

it should be!:(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HughB_au
HughB_au
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Hace is still confusing. Maybe it could have a bit more focus in an earlier lesson?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I think of 'hace' as meaning 'it makes' or 'it's been' = 13 days ago

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It could be considered a trick question (naughty owl!) because hace is also he, she, it, (or Ud.) does or makes. However, the clue is no full stop (period), so it is not a sentence.
OK, it is tricky, but we're more likely to remember it now.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

It may appear tricky but "hace + period of time" is a very common expression that you will encounter often.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I have no problem with the expression, only that, here, it is a phrase with no verb and should not be punctuated as if it were a complete sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karldavj

It has been thirteen days.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lospolloss

I had "since" thirteen days, it got marked wrong. Shouldn"t it be acepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deletemethx

That makes no sense in English. It sounds like you're saying "since" in the sense of "because."

*Edited out phone typos.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/desmondpenn

from when did we were supposed to know "Hace" means "ago"? I have to peek to know the right answer?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/llibllens

If you get it wrong. You remember it better. Part of the DL learning process. Just like in everyday life. We are corrected by natives. Sometimes with proper diction sometimes not. But we learn by doing and being corrected.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2_Learn_Spanish

...it was 13 days away from today.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DorisO

don't understand the use of hace. is it an idiom? Where is that section?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greetasdf

I know it's out of the box but why is 'towards 13 days wrong?'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

"Toward" is "hacia" rather than "hace/hacer".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kilocay

Not sure why it is not , "trece dias ayer"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

"Trece dias ayer" is literally "three days yesterday," and "yesterday" means something different from "ago" ("hace" in Spanish). As for placement, it follows one of those grammatical rules about which we can only shrug, recognize that the sense and placement of the English and Spanish words don't quite coincide, and say "that's just the way it is" or perhaps "that's just the best translation we can achieve given the limitations of English vocabulary."

An examination of the underlying grammar may help: Note where "hace" in the sense of "ago" shows up in Spanish-to-English dictionaries:

  1. It appears under the Spanish verb "hacer" ("to make/build"), within a section that says "no direct translation" alongside similarly impersonal usages that, in the English translation, use the expletive phrase "it is," as in the examples "hace frio" = "it's cold" and "hace sed" = "it's thirsty weather/work." (See http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/hacer.)

  2. It appears under the English verb "to be," still with the sense of ago/in the past, but translated with the expletive phrase "it is": e.g. "hace un año que no la veo" = "it's a year since I saw her" (or arguably, "it was a year ago that I saw her" or "I saw her a year ago.") (See http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/it%20is)

  3. It appears under the English adverb "ago," of course. (See http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/ago). As a side note, the Spanish dictionaries I looked at treat "ago" only as an adverb, though according to dictionary.com, it can also act as an adjective... as an adjective, it can be said to modify a noun (e.g. "[days] [ago]"), or as an adverbial phrase, it can be said to modify an adjective (e.g. [long] [ago]) or a clause (e.g. [It rained] [thirteen days ago]).

Definitions aside, as far as placement, "hace" resembles a preposition, with the word coming before the noun phrase that expresses the time (rather like the prepositional phrases "in the morning/en la mañana" or "before the year 1920/antes del año 1920"--though of course the prepositions don't express the same sentiment as "ago"). Similarly, if you've ever heard some old farmer say with a hick-like drawl "yeah, we had a heavy rainstorm back thirteen days," "hace" uses a similar format. Once again, "back thirteen days" is a poor English translation, and in Spanish, saying "hace" first is standard usage rather than a colloquialism, but I hope that these examples help you wrap your mind around the placement.

In conclusion, is "hace" a verb, an adverb, or some ambiguous idiomatic thing that defies parts of speech? Let it suffice to say that "hace" is weird--and while "ago" is not a direct translation, it's apparently the best we can do. See more at http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/timehacer.htm and http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/hacerago.htm.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s-partridge
s-partridge
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"It makes thirteen days" was accepted as a valid translation. Is there any instance where this could be correct? It doesn't sound right to me at all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/syedyahya11
syedyahya11
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What "hace" literally means

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaneRobins3

I first wrote "It takes thirteen days" and was marked incorrect with the answer "It makes thirteen days". so, the next time that is what I used and was corrected with "thirteen days ago". Please duolingo, be more consistent

2 months ago