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"¿Quién gana?"

Translation:Who wins?

1
5 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Harrizu
Harrizu
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How about 'who is winning?'.

30
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AceOfBens
AceOfBens
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"Is winning" is a different verb tense, which is called the present progressive tense. "Gana" is in the present, making "Who is winning?" incorrect. "Who is winning?" would actually be "¿Quién está ganando?" in Spanish.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcall498
dcall498
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I think that a correct translation should not only capture the exact meaning from the original language into the target language, but also use the terminology and phraseology that would be most natural and common to the target language. In this case, I'm having trouble thinking of a situation in English when I would use "Who wins?" as a stand-alone question.

If I were to walk into a room and see that a game was on and was curious to know which team was in the lead, in Spanish I would say "¿Quién gana?", but in English I would say "Who is winning". Actually I think most people would use a contraction and say "Who's winning" rather than pronounce the extra syllable, but that's beside the point.

Therefore, even though it changes the tense from present to present progressive, I think that "Who is winning?" would be a more accurate translation.

22
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emanon369

If two people are fighting over something stupid, you could ask "who wins?" in the sense of "neither of them is really benefitting from this argument so who wins by arguing in the first place?"

You would also ask "who won?" in many, many cases in english (an award, a game, an election, etc), and who won is just the past tense of who wins. Heck, if someone was reading a book and there was a conflict in the book, I might ask them "who wins the conflict?"

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AtaraxianSpa

When you're talking about a lose-lose situation, "who wins?" could make perfect sense.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
dunk999
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Let's say two people are paying a game that they don't fully understand yet. They reach some point and look at each other and ask, "so... Who wins?"

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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la gana = desire, inclination. (Don't confuse the verb with the noun!)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/psifish
psifish
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My understanding is that "Who is winning?" can be translated correctly as either "¿Quién está ganando?" (present progressive) or "¿Quién gana?" (present). The present progressive gives a word-for-word translation into Spanish, but this tense is used less often than in English and is used for emphasizing that something is happening now. Please correct me if I am wrong.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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I agree entirely. Those people who have discovered the present participle - eg ganando - and say "estar ganando" is the way to translate an English progressive tense are misleading everyone else. A verb such as "gana" absolutely can be vtraoslated as he wins OR he is winning. The other formulation does indeed mean "doing it right now, this minute.."

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

Could not have said it better. I would make a guesstimate that in a book or newspaper one would see 7 uses of "present" tense to every use of the "present progressive." It is wrong to insist that present tense in Spanish must be translated as present tense in English and present progressive in Spanish must be translated as such in English "and never the twain shall meet"--because that just isn't so!

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The problem is, still and again, it would really muddy the teaching effect of Duolingo if they made simple and progressive tenses interchangeable. Even though many Spanish simple-tense sentences sound better when translated into English progressive phrases, it would undermine the importance of Spanish progressive tenses if Duo allowed the mingling of them.

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

I respectfully disagree. In the French course, Duolingo has no problem with accepting both "He wins" and "He is winning" as correct translations of "Il gagne." In the Spanish course, on the other hand, Duo is doing wrong setting walls between the present tenses that simply aren't there in real life.

0
7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VitaBonumEst
VitaBonumEst
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"Gana" and "está ganada" are, in most cases, interchangeable

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Corin_Wright

Everyone can see the two use different verb tenses.. the point is the question asks you to translate it into English. "Who is winning?" is the better translation because "Who wins?" sounds odd unless followed by "you decide". Both should be accepted, the fact you're punished for translating naturally into your own language is utterly ridiculous.

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidRuben4

It seems to me "to win" happens at an instant point in time. When we use "Who wins?" in English, we generally mean, "Who will win?" When we ask about a conflict in an argument or a book or a ball game (as described in comments below), we are really asking either "Who will win?" or "At the end, who will have won?" Spanish may have a different way of reflecting these meanings in ganar.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Freya738304

You are ace, Ben!

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vintourious
Vintourious
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+

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Freya738304

Eh?

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ritwik_mango

Why not "Who earns?"

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kmkennedy111

From the former dictionary hint, it indicated that "gana" meant "earns," but it does not accept it here. I feel like Natariel's comment would be valid if DuoLingo did not present other phrases that seem not to make any sense without context. "Who earns?" is no more awkward than some other translations I've seen on here.

Because "gana" can mean "earns" in one context and "wins" in another, is it more appropriate to think of "gana/ganir" as "gains/to gain?"

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfred-00

¿Cuánto ganas? (Asking for your salary , meaning to earn ) 》gano 6000 al mes (per month) . ¿Quién gana /Quién está ganando?(winning)》está ganando el .... (the...is winning).

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacquismith

Quien I thought means "whoever" too as well as who? So I put whoever wins?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stefanuz

i think you're right about quien also meaning whoever, but "whoever wins?" just doesn't seem like a question, … i mean, what are you actually asking about if you say that?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarmenG.Ga

Thank you for your help. Carmen

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarmenG.Ga

Thanks you

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WaimanLee1

'who wins" without question mark is not accepted. The correct answer was "Who wins?" I didn't know punctuation and capitalization was checked

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanduh320

I'm writing "Who wins?" But it is saying it is wrong. Help!

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasdog81

Who wins? doesn't make any sense? But "Who won" sounds much better. Or, "Who is winning"

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBenet
MattBenet
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I've studied my "wrong answer" for 2 full minutes. I took a screenshot. My wrong answer is "Who wins?) Spare lingots? Spare lingots?

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evie590008

Gyarados is unable to battle! Ash from Pallet Town is the winner!

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crisjordan22

I like who gains. Like a detective might ask. But it is not accepted

0
Reply4 months ago