1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Fa piuttosto caldo qui."

"Fa piuttosto caldo qui."

Translation:It is pretty hot here.

August 1, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ispirac

It is impossible to translate this with logic.We have to remember idioms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Proletar

the reason for "fa" is that you use it together with "caldo". So instead of "è caldo" italians say "fa caldo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fat.k1tty

True, from what I have learned from other resources.

Italians literally ask what the weather "makes", not what the weather "is". "Che tempo fa oggi?" translates literally to "What does the weather make today?", figuratively, "What is the weather today?".

The answer to this would be "Fa caldo oggi" (it makes hot today --> it's hot today), or "Fa bello" (it makes nice --> it's nice) etc. The weather is implied, in that you don't have to add "tempo" into the answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ispirac

It sems useful explanation, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/humanoidbot

What is the difference between qui and qua? Don't they both mean "here"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KSmitch

"Qui" means "specifically right here". "Qua" means "around here".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haiw0n

For any French speakers out there "piuttosto" appears to be a direct equivalent to "plutôt" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Briguy84

I learned somewhere here that when speaking about weather, Italian's use "fare" as oppose to the essere or stare. I think it's because the weather is doing something instead of it is something....could be wrong though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NatKady

so pretty much just like in french "il fait chaud"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2479

Exactly like "il fait chaud" in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IoSonoAmandaM

I wrote "It's really hot here" and still got it wrong. Should that be submitted as a legitimate answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fat.k1tty

The use of "piuttoste" translates better to "rather", so the answer to your question is no.

"It is really hot" would be "fa veramente caldo qui".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melodynoa

What is the dif difference between "qui" and "qua"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dahlie5

qui = right here

qua = around here

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.