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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eriktillema

“più … di ...” versus “(di) più … che ...”

These are my personal notes, maybe they can help someone. Feel free to point out mistakes and holes!

Use DI

  • when two different subjects are compared
  • when directly in front of a number
  • when used in the construction ‘di quanto’ or ‘di quel che’ + verb

Use CHE

  • when the subject stays the same (for example when comparing adjectives, adverbs)
  • when comparing infinitives
  • when directly in front of a preposition (a, in, da, con, …)

Use DI or CHE

  • when comparing times (but di is more common and use ‘rispetto a’ if it’s getting more complicated)
  • when comparing places (but usually places have a preposition)

Examples

  • Io sono più alto di te” (different subjects)
  • La macchina è meno cara della casa” (different subjects)
  • “Mio nonno ha più di 100 anni” (number)
  • “Adesso il bambino è più alto rispetto a due anni fa” (otherwise it would sound weird)
  • “Maurizio oggi è arrivato in ufficio più tardi di(/che) ieri” (comparing times)
  • “Ho più libri che soldi” (same subject, comparing nouns)
  • “La macchina è più bella che veloce” (same subject, comparing adjectives)
  • “Lui lava i piatti più velocemente che bene” (same subject, comparing adverbs)
  • ”Mi piace (di) più fare snowboard che sciare” (infinitives, di is optional)
  • Pescare è più rilassante che nuotare” (infinitives)
  • “Mi sono divertito (di) più a Milano che a Roma” (preposition, di is optional)
  • “A Roma le scarpe sono più care di/che qui” (comparing places)
  • “Qui le scarpe sono più care che a due chilometri a est” (preposition)
  • “Lei è molto più sola di quanto tu creda” (“She is much more lonely than you believe”)

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Italian/Comparatives_and_superlatives

January 21, 2015

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandrabruck

Normally I am a little bit nitpicking, but I have nothing to add to this clear chart ;O)

Perfect work!

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eriktillema

Haha I'm disappointed Sandra ;-)

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sps1919

Grazie mille

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psionpete

In your 5th example, "più tardi di ieri" sounds odd (di ieri), although tardi che ieri sounds equally as bad.

January 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eriktillema

uhm, so what would not sound odd or bad?

January 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psionpete

True

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eriktillema

That was not a true/false question :-p How would you say this in Italian: "Today Maurizio arrived in the office later than yesterday"?

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psionpete

Sorry, I was agreeing with you. I thought your question was rhetorical and not needing an answer.

I just thought that as the Italians hate having two words, with one ending in a vowel and the other starting with a vowel, next to each other e.g. Di ieri, they would have done something to prevent the clash of vowels.

Unfortunately I am not a native speaker so I really do not know.

January 22, 2015
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