"Bácálann mo sheanmháthair gach lá."

Translation:My grandmother bakes every day.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Thus demonstrating the usual way verbs get borrowed into Irish these days.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The ancient native verb for “bake” can be found in eDIL as fo-noí, which seems to have evolved into the modern literary verb fuin. (Apparently the usual non-literary meaning of fuin now is “knead” or “mould”.) It can be found in Dinneen’s dictionary as fuinim; it seems that in 1904 the verb could equally mean “knead”, “bake”, “boil”, or “dress”. (I presume that it could have meant “dress” only in the culinary sense, i.e. “prepare”.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShaneQful

Bearlagais is just something that happens when everyone speaking one language knows another. I think the way Irish has effected how English is spoken in Ireland is a lot more interesting.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

Dat laziness.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

I miss grandmother baking biscuits. :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeamusOD2
SeamusOD2
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Why can't I bake my grandmother. I think it's getting late..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Troublesum1
Troublesum1
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Yeah... "Bácálann," "bácálaim," and "bácáltar" each completely change the meaning of the sentence. Conjugation is important!

(That said, I have no idea whether the idiomatic meaning of the passive case of that verb is the same in Irish as it is in English.)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hec10tor
hec10tor
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Granny smokes pot?!?

23 hours ago
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