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"Nessuno sa come sia arrivata qui."

Translation:Nobody knows how she has arrived here.

January 22, 2015

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElvisShehi

Got instead of arrived should be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex518387

Is 'got' too slang for this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robin138467

Got is a good Anglo Saxon word, I have no problem in using it.

As an aside, English is a mix of Latin and Anglo Saxon. If you don't know a word in Italian then you can sometimes just guess it from the English. However, this only works if the English word is derived from Latin, and not from Anglo Saxon.

As a rule of thumb, English words derived from Anglo Saxon are dominated by consonants and are shorter, whereas Latin derived words are generally dominated by vowels and are longer.

If you don't know an Italian word, first look at the English word. If you think it's from Anglo Saxon, think of an equivalent word in English that is longer and has more vowels. Then guess the Italian word from that.

Have fun!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johelms

I don't think so. It's common usage in American English, anyway, and doesn't read to me (as US speaker) as slangy or informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eraldine

Why not 'he arrived here'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roman.Marinkovic

Lei = arrivata Lui = arrivato


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

The past participle ending in -a ('arrivata') when using 'essere' as the auxiliary means that it's in agreement with the subject. This implies that the subject must necessarily be female.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

But it could also be "... how you arrived here".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriMykolayevych

Yes if you were speaking formally to a woman: Nessuno sa come Lei sia arrivata qui. Added later: See Johelms reply below.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johelms

Yes, but you could also be using the informal. Sia is also the correct conjugation of essere in the present subjunctive for tu. So you could say: Nessuno sa come (tu) sia arrivata qui, speaking informally to a woman as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriMykolayevych

I agree. Thanks for the correction


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/habloparlo

I don't think anyone would say use "has arrived" in this context in American English at least. "No one knows how she got here" sounds best to my ear. "No one knows how she came here" and "No one knows how she arrived" sound okay to me too. But "has arrived sounds really awkward to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emkayheych

I agree - quite a few of these on duolingo, particularly with the Italian translations, odd manners of speaking that sound awkward or even shakespearian at times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex518387

it may sound awkward but isn't this more about trying to use Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PATRICKPIZ1

you should avoid asserting authoritatively that you know how 300,000,000 million people speak. no one would blink an eye upon hearing this in the region where i live.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sam82410

came should also be correct instead of arriveed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charly258104

Perché non può significare "nobody knows how I arrrived here"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johelms

It can and does! Copying my comment below: this sentence could be using singular first, second, or third person. The present subjunctive conjugation of essere is the same for all three (i.e., sia). So as long as the person or object in question is female, it could be translated correctly as: Nobody knows how I/you/she/it arrived here.

I've reported the "you" version, which wasn't accepted 4 March 2019. Hopefully others will do the same for the other versions!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RentnerHertie

Nobody knows how I (have) arrived here ... should also be accepted ... The sentence may have been said by a woman


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johelms

Yes, this sentence could be using singular first, second, or third person. The present subjunctive conjugation of essere is the same for all three (i.e., sia). So as long as the person or object in question is female, it could be translated correctly as: Nobody knows how I/you/she/it arrived here.

I've reported the "you" version, which wasn't accepted 4 March 2019. Hopefully others will do the same for the other versions!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomek237998

Same sense in both suggestions Elvis and sam, but not direct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bellalu64

Yes, we are more likely to say "how she got here" in daily speech rather than the more formal-sounding "how she arrived here".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bellalu64

I am also reporting "no one knows how she got here".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bellalu64

Agreed. "No one knows how she got here" should be correct. Reporting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelASm314026

what is the basic difference in use between sia and abbia for has (verb)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriMykolayevych

The use of sia (essere) or of abbia (avere) depends on the verb that is being helped -> arrivata in this exercise. Arrivata/arrivato takes a conjugated form of essere, not avere, as its helping verb. So the word for word correct Italian = "No one knows how she is arrived here". The closest correct English = "No one knows how she has arrived here".

To express something correctly in one language or another, you sometimes cannot leave it at word for word translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dahai69790

" Nobody knows how she has got here." sounds better to me.

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