"Dit is de vrouw van wie de kinderen geen kleren dragen."

Translation:This is the woman whose children do not wear any clothes.

3 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JcFernandez13
JcFernandez13
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Let us pause all the grammatical analysis for a second and focus on the weirdness of this sentence

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joshua_Mess
Joshua_Mess
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Poor children, horrible mother. Tienes razón ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grinsekotze
Grinsekotze
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How do you know she's a horrible mother? Maybe this is on a beach or something. There are lots of situations in which people don't wear clothes.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grinsekotze
Grinsekotze
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Maybe they just live in a nudist community, that's not that weird

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AsmaaMagdi

So "van wie" takes de after it but "wiens" doesn't? I wrote "Dit is de vrouw wiens de kinderen ..." and it wasn't accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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You're right. Your sentence but without that de is fine. You could also say De vrouw van wie sommige kinderen… that's not possible using wiens.

Edit: so clearly wiens and wier are getting out of use, I'm a native speaker and I only found out in this discussion what the exact difference between the two was. Up to now I only had a vague idea.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErwinRos
ErwinRos
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The male form "Wiens" is not correct. The correct form here would be the female/plural form "Wier": ...de vrouw wier kinderen....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MathLing
MathLing
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The "tips & notes" section says:

«Officially we make a distinction between masculine and feminine (and plurals); feminine should get "wier". However, in practice we do not do this as "wier" sounds very old-fashioned.»

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineStinson
PaulineStinson
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But the preferred solution is to say "van wie" for females, not "wiens", because officially, it is still incorrect.

Onze Taal advises the same: "De taaladviesvoeken adviseren vrijwel allemaal een andere constructie te gebruiken: de vrouw van wie en de mensen van wie. De redenering is: wier is verouderd en komt stoffig over en wiens is grammaticaal eigenlijk niet juist. Je kunt het dus nooit helemaal goed doen; kies daarom als het even kan een formulering met van wie: 'Dat is de vrouw van wie de auto is gestolen' en 'Dat zijn de mensen van wie de auto is gestolen.' Die zinnen zijn zeker goed."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laura847169
Laura847169
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This is because 'wiens' refers to 'from a man' and 'wier' refers to from a woman...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rapoona
Rapoona
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Where does that "any" come from? To my mind the exact translation would be "This is the woman whose children do not wear clothes". Or, including the "any", it would be in Dutch "Dit is de vrouw van wie de kinderen helemaal geen kleren dragen". Yes or no?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkBennett6
MarkBennett6
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"do not wear clothes" is fine. Do report it if it is not accepted. The redundant "any" is just part of English grammar. It's optional whether to include it or not. It should certainly also be accepted as correct. I'm afraid I don't know whether the same structure is idiomatic in Dutch.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remigio.chilaule

Why can't it be "This is the woman whose children do not carry clothes". I know "kleren dragen" is usually "wear clothes" but can't it also mean "carry clothes"? As in carry them from one place to another? I tried it out just to see and it was marked wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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Technically you are correct. 'Kleren dragen' can mean wearing clothes or carrying clothes. For example: Ik draag altijd zwarte kleren, or I always wear black clothes, but Wij dragen onze kleren naar de wasmachine, or We are carrying our clothes to the washing machine. In the exercise sentence, I'm pretty sure the objective is to teach you the Dutch verbiage for wearing clothes, not carrying clothes (to some place).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewSnijders

Dat is ook de vrouw van wie de huis ik zal nooit terug.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronaldsantoro243

My translation: "This is the woman whose children are wearing no clothes." should work. Why doesn't it? I did report it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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This is the woman of whom the children don't wear clothes??? Why not correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkBennett6
MarkBennett6
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In English, the syntax here would imply that the verb "wear" has "of whom" as an indirect object. It would be possible to say "This is the woman of whom the children were talking.", meaning the children were talking about the woman. An English speaker would not easily work out what was meant by your sentence and may understand it to mean that the children do not wear clothes that belong to the woman.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joshua95342
Joshua95342
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What's wrong with translating this to "the woman whose children don't wear clothes"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkBennett6
MarkBennett6
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Your translation doesn't address "Dit is" (This is).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/languagewacko

Dit is the vrouw? I thought that 'dit' refers to het-words and 'deze' to de-words (and plural). Shouldn't it be 'deze vrouw'? Please enlighten me :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoelandSchpns
RoelandSchpnsPlus
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"Dit is de vrouw" would translate to "this is the woman" in English, while "Deze vrouw" would translate to "This woman". In the first sentence, 'this' is a demonstrative pronoun, while in the second sentence, 'this' is a demonstrative adjective. Dutch uses different words for these. I hope this helps.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stu516623
Stu516623
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In English, there's a difference between "children don't wear clothes" and "children aren't wearing clothes." Both seem to be acceptable translations of this Dutch sentence. Is there a way to distingish them in Dutch?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cseklaltoe

why doesn't this is the mother whose kids don't wear any clothes right it really should be

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Mother = moeder

1 year ago
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