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"Algunos animales viven en la profundidad del mar."

Translation:Some animals live in the depths of the sea.

0
5 years ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/thomson45

What's wrong with ocean?

13
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

ocean = oceano, and Duo can be fussy

8
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pericoro61
Pericoro61Plus
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"Some animals live deep in the sea" sounds better

... live in the depths of the sea... sounds wordy to me... anyone else feel the same?

12
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/junevilleco

I put "in the deep sea" which I think should be correct, but was marked wrong; I agree, except in literature I have never heard "the depths of the sea".

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah-
Isaiah-
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Being wordy or overly literary does not make something incorrect. I think you should bear in mind, the purpose of this site is to teach you how to translate text. So if it sounds like a text, not speech, that's not a problem. Translating it incorrectly, "deep in the sea" or "in the deep sea" is a problem. IMHO.

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting
Owlspotting
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Actually, the observation that "the purpose of this site is to teach you how to translate text" is not an argument against "in the deep sea" in favor of "in the depths of the sea"--if in English the first one both (1) captures the meaning of "en la profundidad del mar," and (2) does so in a more colloquial way. After all, you wouldn't say that "Tengo hambre" should be translated as "I have hunger" instead of "I"m hungry"--even though the former is structurally closer to the source text.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

There's something to both points of view. However, I believe the major problem with assuming anything that "captures the meaning" (especially if it's colloquial?) allows for a nearly infinite variety of translations. No one in their right mind would attempt to program around that possibility. So, given the practical limits of CPU processing power, Internet bandwidth, and programmer resources, it makes no sense to assume you can enter any phrase you want that effectively means the same thing in a given context.

Your example of "tengo hambre" is interesting because it provides an example of an idiomatic difference between English and Spanish rather than a substitution of a (common) colloquialism for a more literal translation. English speakers just don't say, "I have hunger," and Spanish speakers just don't say, "Estoy hambriento." That difference between the languages is not the same as simply rephrasing something to words you prefer. The Spanish phrase "Tengo hambre" means the same thing as the English phrase "I'm hungry." That would be the translation without any other context. That shouldn't mean Duo must allow "tengo hambre" to be translated as "I'm starving" or "my stomach feels so empty that I should get something to eat," etc.

2
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Isaiah: I agree.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Yo también

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

As someone else pointed out, changing the phrase in these ways actually changes the meaning. Just because you don't like a particular phrasing doesn't mean you should substitute something else. It's even more problematic when your substitution alters the meaning of the original.

While "deep in the sea" comes close to the original, "in the deep sea" does not. The original phrase "depths of the sea" is quite specific about where these animals live (i.e., close to the bottom). The other two phrases lack that absolute sense of deep. Animals can live at the surface of the deep sea and still live "in the deep sea." Likewise, animals can live "deep in the sea" without reaching the depths, the deepest part of the sea.

If you really, really don't want to say "the depths," you should at least speak of the deepest reaches of the sea. Simply saying "deep" is not sufficient. That said, I doubt Duo would accept, "Some animals live in the deepest parts of the sea."

3
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

Since you have del (de el) profundidad in the Spanish phrase does indicate that 'of the' might figure somewhere in the answer. However that said, if Duo had more closely followed the more common way of indicating 'the depths of the sea/the bottom of the sea' by pluralising 'profundidad' perhaps we might have avoided this confusion. It difficult to understand why Duo wouldn't do that!

Algunos animales viven en las profundidades del mar

2
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Good points. I wonder if using the singular is common enough in Spanish that the English use of a plural is what's unusual. I've seen it both ways in Spanish. So, I don't know what is most common.

In the end, I'm not sure that will overcome the confusion. I believe some people just don't want to say "depths of the sea" and think that they can use "deep sea" instead. The real confusion is among those who don't seem to grasp the differences between these English phrases.

2
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

I am a marine biologist. We say "in the depths of the sea".

1
Reply4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VidaAudrey

I feel the same here. "some animals live in the deep sea" sounds normal

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ylu2k9

Ditto

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcasten
jjcasten
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I agree. It should be "in the deep sea". That's the correct English translation, even in formal written texts.

-2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyNZ

That really isn't an accurate translation of the Spanish phrase. See the comment below from mrbennet - he nailed it. However, "deep in the sea" has the same meaning as "in the depths of the sea" so that should be accepted.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregAngeli

I wrote, "live deep in sea," too and was marked wrong, it does sound better. I reported it.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

You would have to add "the" - "live deep in the sea" - to make this a correct phrase in English.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shilohmn
shilohmn
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I agree!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s-partridge
s-partridge
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I would use "in the depths" myself, but without context I think adding "of the sea" adds clarity. That, and "deep in the sea" should also work.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyNZ

I wonder why DL accepts "depths", a plural, when "profundidad" is singular". An idiom, maybe?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tdolphin

In English, the expression for the very deepest part of the sea is "the depths" (plural) - it's a bit literary but people do use it in normal speech.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Andy, in a previous sentence, Duo did not accept "the depths" for the phrase la profundidad. Very capricious. I'll be sure to report it should I see it again.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lingolas7
lingolas7
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same here ;-)

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I wrote "in the depth of the sea" and it was not accepted. I reported it as an error; however, I concede that the plural form is more prevalent in English literature. Still, if the plural is used among native Spanish speakers, then it should be used here. Generally we try to translate as literally as possible within the bounds of what sounds normal to the native speaker.

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Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IshtarmuzI

I do believe their own translation is in error. I would be profundidades for depths and profundidad for depth

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpadmakumar22

Poque es del mar? no habre "de la mar?"

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Interestingly enough, mar is one of the few Spanish nouns of ambiguous gender, so both should be accepted. "El mar" is generally more common, but "la mar" seems to be used in some contexts, and often by sailors.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chunkylefunga

Up on the shore they work all day Out in the sun they slave away While we devotin' Full time to floatin' Under the sea

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alback-isback
alback-isback
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Can someone please explain me these two cases: La observación tiene un límite - if translated as The observation has a limit it is marked wrong saying THE shouldn't be there but here: "Algunos animales viven en la profundidad del mar." - in the depths of THE sea. If I omit THE the sentence is wrong

1
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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"Del" is a contraction for "de el."

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Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackRue
BlackRue
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"Some animals live in the deep sea" is correct, I believe

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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No, that would be "en el mar profundo". It's subtly different: the deep sea includes the surface layers as well as the depths.

2
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tdolphin

I agree - "in the deep sea" means the same thing as "in the sea that is deep", which is not the same as "in the deep part of the sea". The first sentence could mean any part of that sea (the sea that's deep).

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dxxb

It says profundidad is depth or depths. I used profundidad for depths in another question and it said it was wrong. Here I put depth and it says it could also be depths.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/polindsay

"...in the deep sea" should be an alternate acceptable translation.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madix99

I think I have been wrongly saying "depth of the sea" rather than "depths of the sea" all my life :) Never too old to learn!

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Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larisa649284

I wrote the same translation as DL gives but it marks it wrong

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Reply1 month ago