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"Ella lo deja."

Translation:She lets him.

5 years ago

102 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kooky13

I would think depending on context "she leaves it" would be correct

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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She leaves him. (accepted)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thefifthjudge
thefifthjudge
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Ouch.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlokken

She lets him wad also accepted, but it give no sence?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tanyabon
Tanyabon
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They accept it

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaritaFlau
SaritaFlau
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I thought so too. :-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HalieLOVESBatman

i agree...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lex.Humphr

Agreed

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Doug_Herbert

Why not "she allows it"? That sounds much more natural to me than "she lets it."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanFeldman

I agree. Why is "she allows it" not accepted? I understood dejar as "to allow"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

to let - dejar
to allow - permitir

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Izabela_K
Izabela_K
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duolingo still doesn't accept "she allows it" as of 4-10-2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterDowns
PeterDowns
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Apparently they don't understand that 'allow' and 'let' are synonyms in English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FtyshadesofJay

same as of 5-4-2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foonly
Foonly
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Duoling finally accepts it as of 9.2.2017

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EldonLocka

Nope 2018 and still rejected

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D.Krynicki
D.Krynicki
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I agree, there's no reason that shouldn't be correct

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aelfwyne

It's still not correct. It should be. At least now we don't lose hearts for these errors.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kspanish1959

I agree. I am not a native speaker. Why is "allows" incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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Still not accepted 11/29/15 . I can't report it on my phone. Have to go on computer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cuatro_dedos

STILL not accepted 11/2016. I think the DL folks are falling down on the job. Please fix the damn oversight. Yes, I (along with everyone else) have reported it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scarolan108

Piling in on this one. Please fix DuoLingo. 'Allows' is perfectly acceptable here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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Agree!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mauro_petauro

Still not accepted in july 16

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jboling73
jboling73
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4/24/17 "she allows it" is still not accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mauro_petauro

Finally! September 2017 "she allows it" is accepted

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cuatro_dedos

Well merry friggin' almost Christmas- still not accepted 12/2016. DL- time to do an overhaul of your oversights. We appreciate the opportunity you provide with free language tutoring, but PLEASE, don't make the experience unnecessarily frustrating!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dejoyf

Agree

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

This sentence is best regarded in one's mind as:

"She himself she lets." (Or "allows.")

The challenge here is to begin thinking in this totally non-English form of mental construction. It is altogether different than an Engliush form of thought and a real challenge to get a hold of.

This Comment thread would be far better focused on that subject matter and not the different ways something can be said in English which have no use when using Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

EugeneTiffany: What in the world does "She himself she lets." mean? I could understand 'She him she lets' But where does the word 'self' occur?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

The “lo" in the Spanish sentence provided MEANS, "himself." Note how I did not say the " lo" TRANSLATES to "himself." What Spanish words can TRANSLATE to and what they MEAN are not the same thing. English has little or no bearing on what Spanish words MEAN. So one needs to ultimately leave off thinking in perfect English and begin thinking in a new way in regard how Spanish sentences are structured which can be quite different from English. What I said priorly was intended to illustrate how the Spanish sentence was structured, and was not meant as an English TRANSLATION.

The English sentence Duolingo shows us are only to help us understand what the Spanish sentences are saying. And once we have that clue we need to then apply the information derived so we can begin thinking in Spanish without considering any translation. And to do that we need to begin thinking using the structure which Spanish sentences have. And in this one the "lo" MEANS, "himself."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

Woah woah woah, the 'lo' means 'himself'? Since when? And how? And why? I thought 'lo' was simply a pronoun that could either be 'him' or 'it'. So when I see this sentence I see "She (him or it) allows or leaves or lets," so I translate it to "she's either leaving or letting him or it," and have to use context to figure out exactly what's being said, which of course is never given in DUO, but in conversation I imagine I would understand.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

There is a difference between what words in a Spanish sentence can be translated to and what they mean. To best understand a Spanish sentence so as to begin to be able to start thinking like a native speaker, consider what the words mean besides what they translate to. This is extremely important.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

I agree, thinking like a native speaker is best. But that doesn't mean over complicating things unnecessarily. For me, it starts with realizing that sentence structure, and thus sentence formation, begins in a different way. Thinking that "lo" here means "Himself" in no way helps me comprehend, or anyone for that matter, because 'lo' does not mean 'himself.' I look at it as the speaker needing to recognize that "lo deja" is an unbreakable formation. Start with the verb, deja, deja what? Deja lo, or lo deja, then who lo deja? Ella! As opposed to an English formation.. which is to start with 'she' and then explain what she's doing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2oWfQrINAfc

Oh now I get it... 'lo' means 'himself'. I am one with the universe. You must let go of your English. Comprehension stems from meaning. We are all one.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

You’re still focusing on translation, not meaning. You are trying to make sense of the Spanish using English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

That’s true. In the 1st Dimension there is but one thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shamshoomi
Shamshoomi
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I totally agree, however I have two questions: 1) Is it wrong to say she lets "it"? 2) Can we say: "Ella lo deja a èl" to clarify? An explanation would be appreciated

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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For your first question, no, it's not wrong to say "She lets it"; lo stands for "him or a masculine/neuter "it", and so a yes to your second question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shamshoomi
Shamshoomi
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Thanks a lot :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blglenn1

Is there an explanation regarding how "lo" means "him/himself"? Perhaps some examples of "lo" in context or use to explain when it means "him" instead of "it"? Or an explanation on how an English speaker can recognize the reference when to understand the word "lo" to mean "him/her".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gringaerin
gringaerin
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I've had other excercises that say "deja" means stop? "El perro no deja de comer" for example. So why can't this be "she stops him"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Subhasini108

I under stood that it only means stop when followed by 'de' dejar de

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonesShelley

So it means to stop and also to allow? Kinda the opposite of each other. Also to leave? Confusing!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dooganhole

Why is "lo" him and not it here?? Not understanding that

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lierluis
lierluis
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It can be either one

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leo_H.
Leo_H.
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"She lets it." was rejected, though...

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porkrind94
porkrind94
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allows it and lets it again are universally interchangeable. That needs to be changed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marbellous
Marbellous
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So to specify that she leaves HIM I can say "Ella lo deja a él"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lluckylluke

Yes, the 'a el' clarifies the object

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davgleonard

muchacha traviesa, donde ella vive? :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stokeysam
stokeysam
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Dirty girl!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joealcorn105

A vote for "she leaves it" also

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michaelvallarta

why not 'she leaves him'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

This is now accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunsetchaser

Sounds like "She allows it" is now accepted, but "She lets it" is not.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ilene-in-DP

She leaves was accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

What do they mean by she lets him. She lets him go OR she allows or permit him

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

She lets him. Correct 10/28/15

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atokirina

Still confused about the use of dejar... How do you say, "She stops him/it", native Spanish speakers? Thank you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

I'm having some trouble with dejar. Apparently it means "Let" as well as "allow" as well as "leave"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreebirdRising

How do you differentiate between "leave" and "let" definitions for deja?

In English it's not difficult to craft a scenario where one word meaning both could easily confuse a direction... Am I allowing others to do something, or am I leaving it behind myself?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrisDurfee

I am terribly confused as to when "lo" means "it" or "him" or "her" or "them".....It seems haphazard to me. Could someone give me a clue:?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrisDurfee

How do you great Spanish speakers differentiate between "lo" meaning "it" and "lo" meaning "him"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilmaZalab

I need the same clue, please.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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You would know whether “lo” means it or him by the context in which it is used (which is not provided in Duolingo).

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/letter_s
letter_s
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The drop down box indicates "leaves" is a definition of this word." She leaves him "makes a lot more since then "She lets him"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/letter_s
letter_s
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"Ella lo deja" - She leaves him - is wrong and I can't understand why.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aymarieke

yes, that should be accepted, "she leaves him" makes much more sense to me too

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Accepted Nov 28 2013

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Felipeldx
Felipeldx
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Wouldn't "Ella le deja." be better?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MargaretCa12555

"She allows it." is still not accepted!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/herbert1985
herbert1985
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Vette ya Si no encuentra motivos para vivir con migo. Para que continuar?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swedishmaid
swedishmaid
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It says she lets him. Since when did dejar mean let?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolJB44

Even She permits it should be ok, I think!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mit187387

Giddy up!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dare3966
Dare3966
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She lets it. (accepted). She let it. (not accepted) hmm???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunsetchaser

"let" would be past tense

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dare3966
Dare3966
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Oh yea, Ella lo dejo.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jestandi

God damn it it's hard for me to hear the difference between "lo" and "no"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/margheritacarter

Duolingo people WAKE UP! In English "let" and "allow" are synonyms. Correct your system once and for all!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gengym
Gengym
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I am very confused, I entered "She allows it" and it didn't work. So I entered in "She allows him" and that didn't work either (and it corrected it to that the first time)!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/23bullisli

She lets him is a sentance fracture. What does she allow him to do? Stop being confusing Duolingo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annie183

They change my answer

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annie183

I wright the good answer they change my answer how come

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djwhitten

Any idea why, as of 10-10-2017 they are rejecting "She lets it," but are accepting "She allows it," and "She lets him"?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilmaZalab

Somewhere here I thought I learned that le is the masculine object and lo is the neuter object. I think "she lets it" should be allowed. Or can someone explain the le and the lo? Please.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManDanger

She lets him what? ;-)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heartless_Nobody

Why is "She allows him." not acceptable? 11.14.17

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

"She is leaving him" should be accepted.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomas649971

Now 12/2017 she lets it is marked wrong. SMH after the suggestion says lets...

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HalieLOVESBatman

close da app.... it has been 4 year.... FOURRRRRR.... -_-

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HalieLOVESBatman

fawk

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ken_Schiering

i think this should be acceptable. She drops it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/herbert1985
herbert1985
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She dumps him not accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RBFriend
RBFriend
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Given the patriarchal nature of western society this sentence sounds like it mean she let's him have his way sexually with her, ie. rape. I object to this sentence and request it be removed

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardZoesch

why not "she let him"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergeantFTC

Because that would be in the past tense

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neptune

Ricardo 4, Your sentence is correct in the subjunctive. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

... except that that 3-word sentence cannot be in the subjunctive, can it? It would have to be part of a longer sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scienceteaches

should work!

5 years ago