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"A look is like a landscape."

Translation:Una mirada es como un paisaje.

1
5 years ago

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kainui

A look is like a landscape. What does that even mean in English?

70
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

Google returns: 'No results found for "Una mirada es como un paisaje"' Clearly this is not a standard Spanish phrase, and means as little as it does in English! Una mirada also means a view, as in a view from the mountain, so it would be correct to say "una mirada del paisaje" (a view of the landscape).

18
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

Ahh, my mother used to say that all the time.

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/levelledout

I had never heard this idiom before seeing it today but can only think it means something along the lines of "You can tell a lot about what a person is thinking or feeling from the way they look at you", i.e. their look is as revealing as an entire landscape.

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marco681937

Never heard before, but my idea is that some persons you can understand immediately at the first look.

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian.Mckay

Pretty as a picture

1
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simonla

I don't think there is an equivalent, but it sounds like an expression, image, or saying.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skeez1960

not sure, but "mirar al paisaje = admire the landscape"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neil415839

If it means anything at all in English, it's using "landscape" in the sense of "painting of the scenery". Which would make the Spanish wrong anyway. Its basically just a bad exercise. Report it and move on.

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Okay, there is obviously some confusion. There seem to be two points of trouble here.

1st: Una mirada is a reference to style (adj. Dicho de una persona: Que obra con miramiento, see www.rae.es )

2nd: The way you should read this phrase is more akin to "Fashion is like scenery" not "Your glance has trees in it, and mountains!"

and lastly, this is not a common phrase, but it does exist in the poetic corners of the web: por ejemplo: Y tu mirada es como un paisaje en el agua.

I will leave it to y'all to translate that on your own, because it is really nice.

24
Reply43 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_smiles_

Agreed that the poetic value of this construction is evident, and I like it.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I have a rather unrelated question about the -je (or -aje??) ending in Spanish. I have recently noticed these endings turning verbs into nouns. "Para acelerar el abordaje, favor de salir por la puerta trasera" I have also seen aprendizaje. I had always understood that the Spanish used the infinitive of a verb to make a noun where English uses the gerund. Is there a difference in either usage or meaning in these forms, and are there many more? I noticed the paisaje, which I had known, which seems to be using to ending to alter one noun to another. Unless I am having a "senior moment" I don't believe I have ever learned anything about this as a suffix. Sorry for the off-topic question, but I have had a problem finding information about this.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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There is information about the suffix -aje, but you are right, one really has to search for it. And it isn't off topic since paisaje is a perfect example.

So you know how some words in Spanish end in -ma but are masculine? Problema, mapa, programa... Those are all borrowings from other languages (Greek mostly). Similarly, the words that end in -aje almost always signal a word borrowed into Spanish during the medieval period or modified into a new meaning since the 17th century.

So as the Spanish culture was emerging out of the pieces captured from the Moorish Caliphate, the language began accreting new words. One of the major sources was French, partly because the royal families and other nobles began interbreeding, but also because France had words for the feudal system taking hold in Spain during this era. One of the major borrowings from French was país (from the French pays), and so inevitably paysage entered the Spanish vocabulary. The differences in spelling are simple transpositions to accomodate the differences in how hispanohablantes would hear a true French pronunciation of /pe.i.zaʒ/. In time the -aje suffix naturalized to Spanish and began to attach to other words. It isn't terribly common, but it has the following uses according to the RAE

  1. suf. Forma sustantivos que expresan acción. Aterrizaje, abordaje, aprendizaje. (make nouns that express action)
  2. suf. Puede designar derechos que se pagan. Almacenaje, hospedaje, pupilaje. (to designate rights that are paid for)
  3. suf. A veces indica conjunto. Cordaje, ramaje. (sometimes indicates joining)
15
Reply22 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Thank you! Exactly what I was looking for.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chingmoj
Chingmoj
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At last, a phrase as pretty as the picture it paints

2
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Fashion is like scenery. In Paris.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T_Late
T_Late
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I appreciate the clarity -- to my memory, I've never seen nor heard this expression!

One could also imagine that it could be used in different poetic/literary ways with "look" meaning "glance", any of which I would have believed (and given my thanks for the clarity) because of the obscurity of the original sentence. E.g.:

  • "A glance is vast"

  • "A glance is an invitation to explore [the inner being of the glancer]" (in a "eyes are the windows to the soul" manner)

  • "A glance is warm and beautiful"

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I actually took this to mean look as in a modern look or a fashionable look. That would definitely be mirada not vista.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/55pat55

I wish DL would give us more useful phrases to work with.

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeopardPepper
LeopardPepper
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My auto correct said "A look is like a prostate."

Esa no es una mirada buena.

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ratakoolta
ratakoolta
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Un aspecto es como un paisaje? This doesn't even exist in spanish!!! Duolingo que esta pasando?

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

This is a horrible sentence. I understand DL throws in a lot of strange sentences to make us think, sentences we'll NEVER use in actual conversation unless we're tripping on LSD, but this one is just BAD. It appears that "aspecto" translates to "appearance" or "aspect". Regarding the word "aspecto" DL's English translation "A look..." probably isn't best because it sounds like it's talking about the act of "taking a look". Perhaps a better English translation (based on "aspecto") is "The appearance is like a landscape" or "It has the appearance of a landscape", which actually makes some sense. But if the English sentence is "A look is like a landscape" then I think "mirada" is the right English word and they should drop the accepted translation using "aspecto".

Regarding the sentence: "A look is like a landscape", if they mean "a look" as in "take a look", the physical act of looking, that makes no sense. A physical act is like a quality? Sitting is like a sunset? On LSD, yes.

6
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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I had the same term used by Duo in my exercise (aspecto); I agree with you that Duolingo should probably drop aspecto. Or better yet, just drop the whole sentence from the exercise.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Estrellawang

What's the difference between vista and mirada?

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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'mirada' is 'look, glance' as in what somebody make make at you; 'vista' is view like you'd see looking at at the world.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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In my exercise, Duo had "aspecto", and not "mirada", but then "mirada" is what appears above on this page. Wonder if it ever means "someone's 'appearance' (look) is like a landscape"? If someone told me "your appearance is like a landscape" I would surely think he's being poetic lol (and just wouldn't hope he's thinking of a desert!) :D

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InfamousMrSatan
InfamousMrSatan
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This sounds like an idiom or proverb. Native speaker please! What does it mean?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

"A look is like a landscape" searched on Google appears 7 times. All hits are at DuoLingo. This is not a phrase that Google has found even ONCE outside of DuoLingo.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Hard to believe, but there is life beyond the Internet.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I think this is a bit like, "The eyes are the window of the soul." You lock eyes with a beautiful woman and suddenly a whole landscape of possibilities opens up to you." But if you try this you must perfectly channel the timing and accent of Antonio Banderas. And few gringos other than me can pull it off. ?Verdad?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

This sentence takes too much pretending, too much "it's a bit like..." to try and understand. I like DL's silly sentences, plays on current memes etc. I just don't like the ones that seem like gibberish. This is one.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnspanish2713

What would the equivalent expression be in English?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The view is like a landscape. (?)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klorathy
klorathy
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It makes as much sense as "A monkey is like a landscape" in english - it just isn't an English expression.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HallyMc
HallyMc
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I can't even.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nckato
nckato
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Then don't.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dot794307

Ok. Why does it tell me un mirada is wrong and i shoukd be using un aspecto?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Probably because you used "un" instead of "una". Duolingo tends to give corrections that are closest to/based on how we erroneously answered, so it gave "aspecto" to match your "un". (I'm guessing here.)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maityty
maityty
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Waht does this mean?

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian.Mckay

Possibly " pretty as a picture" as an english equivalent!

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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This isn't in the idioms section, so translation as another idiom is not appropriate. Many users dislike that anyway because it is not teaching Spanish really. There is only one word in your suggestion that is a translation for a single Spanish word given, and that is "a"

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T_Late
T_Late
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I was marked wrong for "Una vista es como un paisaje." I don't know why this is wrong since "la vista" can be used synonymously with "la mirada" in certain contexts (it's not incorrect to translate "la vista" as "the gaze" sometimes). Is using "vista" rather than "mirada" actually incorrect? I suppose that whether or not one can exchange "vista" and "mirada" depends on context, and since I'm not sure what this sentence means, I have no idea if this is such a context!

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onig49

This is a completely unnatural sentence; who the hell, and under the influence of what, would say anything like that? Maybe the point of the exercise is duolingo wants to be sure that we can translate surrealist comments.

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OMDC7
OMDC7
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I picked Aspecto because it was the first option and it was counted wrong.

0
Reply6 months ago