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"Él no acepta."

Translation:He does not accept.

5 years ago

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/klooth
klooth
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Prosecutor: "I offered your client a deal". Defender: "He doesn't accept."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/priella1

I went with "He doesn't accept." also...

but it sounds ... hmm wrong as a translation.. like the (it) seems to be missing at the end.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

It it is a curt statement.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

I can only find "accept" as a transitive verb in both English (Oxford Dict) and Spanish, so if we want "aceptar" here to mean "accept" then I'd expect a lo or a stated object, although I also agree that this can be a curt (no imagined misspelling here) statement. On the other hand, if we opt for "aceptar" here to mean "agree" (which is another meaning of aceptar)...

P.S. Oh, and "He doesn't agree" is accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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This is an interesting one Tessbee. You are absolutely right that because "aceptar" is a transitive verb we expect either an object or an object pronoun. I have a feeling though that "aceptar" can be used intransitively as "agree" or "accept" within context. This required context being that whatever is being agreed to or accepted has already been established and isn't a noun but a verb. eg. "Le pido que venga. Él no acepta" - "I ask him to come - He does not accept/agree."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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It wasn't irresponsible Tessbee as it is a natural expectation, especially in the Spanish where I'm almost certain an object or object pronoun would be necessary if whatever being "accepted" was something. Even in English when the verb is properly being used transitively we can expect an object, so what you said is totally justified.

The point of difference you made between the transitive and intransitive use of the verb was what I was expanding on: If the verb is referring to something it is transitive, however if it is merely referring to the act it is intransitive. This can become blurry with a verb like "accept" because when used intransitively it can refer both to the act (I accept) and implicitly to something (I accept [your offer]). However, in the absence of an object the act of accepting can stand alone as a valid intransitive use.

After a bit of digging I found an example in Spanish. "Aceptar" is described in SpanishDict's main dictionary as a transitive verb only. However, in the same dictionary we can find an example of "aceptar" being used intransitively. See definition 2.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

I believe you're right, Jellonz. One reason I specifically mentioned which English dictionary I checked "accept" on is that other dictionaries might have a listing for it as both transitive and intransitive, and that to let others know that my finding was only according to the specified dictionary.

And yes, I guess it was a bit irresponsible for me to say that I'd expect a stated object for a transitive verb since, of course, objects can be implied or could have been previously established. Thanks for straightening me out! ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0christ.e

Is "he does not accept it" a correct translation?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conpanbear

You may think it sounds wrong, but it's valid English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidVizi

To me, the most "natural" translation is: He doesn't agree. Which I actually answered and it took it as correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorGwilym

client: That deal was worth as much as macaroni to my and I hate macaroni so yeah

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

The reason that "El no acepta" sounds incomplete is because in English "accept" is usually a transitive verb. In fact, one dictionary had nine different definitions for "accept" as a transitive verb but only one for "accept" as an intransitive verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

I expected a "lo" before the verb. That tends to happen in Spanish. Eg, "no lo se."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cowann17

but many times, you can say just no se, meaning the same thing, I usually don't put it there a lot, and I am pretty sure it is used for people mostly

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alves-Paulo

I wrote "He doesn't accept it" and the machine hasn´t accepted it!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

That would be "él no lo acepta" - they did not include an "it" ("lo") in the sentence, so they docked you for adding a word

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Radunya

Technically yes, but in English the verb is usually transitive as discussed above. It seems in Spanish it's more normal for it to be intransitive

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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It is transitive, anyway. As discussed first above by Klooth and below under the comment by Baker910, in conversational English we frequently, in context, omit words that are implied and/or understood by virtue of the context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Radunya

That's not entirely true and Klooth's example doesn't work since accept can be both transitive and intransitive when talking about offers. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/accept

Transitive verbs NEED an object. Take "to like" for example. "I like." is not a complete sentence in English. You need to say "I like it/them." Or you can use the auxiliary verb if you're answering a question. Ex: "Do you like coffee" "Yes, I do." but "I like." is NEVER acceptable answer to this question even though the object is understood.

I seems that in Spanish it's perfectly normal to omit the object when it's understood, which just means more of their verbs are intransitive. However, "I accept it" should still be allowable as a English translation, since English speakers usually use the transitive definition.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eraves
eraves
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hahaha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejdarnboy

You are still right but it just doesnt know english very well

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgalestep

Me too. The machine does not accept initial posts, either, at the moment.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/picojeff

In wikipedia there are 9 definitions of accept, and only the last one is intransitive. In English this word is rarely used without an object. Is it equally rare in Spanish? Or are we translating a common usage into an uncommon one?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/modigtm

"...the sofa"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevenLawry

Poor sofa XD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda479588

Sounds like doctor and actor.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maximavargs

i put ''he doesn't accept'', but it put ''correct solution'' ''he does not accept'', that it's wrong, because ''doesn't'' is the same as ''does not'' why duolingo it put me that was wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evander32102

Mrs.Tiffany, what does curt mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamakrishnanRS

It means "brief" or "very short" to the point of coming across as a little rude.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sheila.mcg

I put he won't accept. It took a heart. How would you say ,He won't accept

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KICIACOLDS

He wont accept would have a different translation, like "Él no aceptará." He will not accept.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annanz01

Oops, I put He is not acceptable. How would you say that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

That would require the verb "ser" - to be

(él) No es aceptable

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarilynVan2

I don't feel that's right. I want to say El no lo acepta.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamDuk2

I put "he declines". I figured they wanted "he doesn't accept", but I would never say that in English even if it is grammatically correct. Oh well. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/graceizzy52

i spelled accept wrong and they said it was wrong and so they took away some points from the bar. they have never done this to me why do they start doing it now? It makes me so mad!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMarim

...the terms and conditions

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evander32102

WHAT TERMS & CONDITIONS

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ihitlikeagirl

why is He won't accept, incorrect?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeresaViey

I am bilingual and duolingo told me "he doesn't accept it" is incorrect. Lies.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamakrishnanRS

I have difficulties understanding the verb usage. comer becomes como, come and comen for yo, el (he) and ellos. Why does this verb not becomes acepto, acepte and aceptes?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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You're comparing an -er verb with an -ar verb. Both "comer" and "aceptar" are regular verbs that follow the conjugation rules you can find here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamakrishnanRS

Thank you. It was an hour after posting this, when I was listening to the Coffee Break Spanish podcast, that I learned that there are -ar, -er and -ir verbs. I am yet to learn the differences in conjugation, but I will hopefully learn them soon. Thank you again!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samoconnor

one want to know why he doesn't accept

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamGeelhood72582

It sounded to me like "Ella no acepta." I need to start listening to native spanish speakers, not Duo lingo's voice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilianoZazueta
EmilianoZazueta
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Esto se pondrá feo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fcspatriciab

What does he not except ? ? <sub>~</sub>~

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skywatcher10

He is in denial.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sumxs1
Sumxs1
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What is the difference between except and accept? Tired and not great at structure. Are they different types of verbs?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Yes, as verbs they are very different.

Accept: to receive, to agree with, to say yes.

Except: to leave out, to exclude.

"Except" as a verb is not so commonly used, at least not properly. It is commonly misused when "accept" should have been instead.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smilinsteve7256

It should say "He doesn't accept IT....which is understood and flows better

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeriRoth

Cant type an accent mark

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beggumnur

Why does this example keep coming?? So annoying, there is no other example left? Its been 10th time

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alison257494
Alison257494
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"He does not accept" is an incomplete sentence, even in the examples that others have come up with. "He does not accept it" should be accepted. Lol!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosemaryPRN

Am I the only one who just saw this 7 times in a row? These things are starting to repeat immediately in the same lesson

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abbybun_

Anyone else have this problem? Ive gotten this one like 5 times in a row... it has happened before with others too

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HectorDesa6

Accept what?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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Accept (or not accept) whatever was offered in the course of a conversation. If you had the context of the exchange, as in a normal conversation, you would know.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilikosha
ilikosha
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Pronounced like assetta

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LisaM909805
LisaM909805
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"He is not accepting" is also correct

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeriAnne651641

Most speakers of English would expect to hear what he does not accept. I would never say He does not accept - it needs an object.

4 months ago