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  5. "Paul drinks wine before the …

"Paul drinks wine before the cat."

Translation:Ólann Pól fíon roimh an gcat.

January 23, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robin997695

Cat's gotta wait his turn ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

Paul's spoiling the cat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yep. After a preposition (roimh) and the singular definite article (an), the following noun eclipses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TArdy44

Paul is Paul. Pól is Pól. I became Éilís when I started school, and I never recovered!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HighlandGirl

I can't remember does Eilis mean Elizabeth


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilyMor26

exactly. It's wrong to be expected to give a translation of someone's name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1393

Because the vocative case in Irish relies on Irish spelling rules, it has long (as in centuries) been the practice to use Irish forms of traditional names (Biblical names and other traditional English names) in Irish. It's not wrong to use Irish forms of names in Irish, and you have to know the Irish form of a name to do that.

De Bhaldraithe's 1959 English Irish Dictionary includes this paragraph in the Plan of the Dictionary:

Proper names are included in the body of the dictionary and not in separate lists. Personal names which have the same form in Irish and English have been omitted. It is a well-established practice to equate English and Irish personal names which have no historical relation to each other. These equations are recorded here. The problem of whether to use an Irish form or the original form of a foreign name is an extremely difficult one. The aim here has been to record Irish forms, but not to proscribe the use of the original form.

The EID has an entry for "Paul".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RYANinHD_87

So does "before" also have two meanings in Irish? One meaning "in front of" and one meaning "earlier in time"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1393

Strictly speaking, "before" doesn't have any meaning in Irish, but roimh does have both the "in front of" and the "earlier" meanings.

Nífimid ár lámha roimh an dinnéar - "we will was our hands before dinner"
Tá an ceapaire roimhe - "the sandwich is in front of him"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJCasey

Oh I have to translate the feckin name of this lad apparently


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joseph467200

when is ar ag and roimh used also when and why are g and m added to the


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConanDoyle11

I wish we had the chance to hear the sentence more in this language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilyMor26

in all the other Duolingo languages you get marked wrong for translating the name given, and this is as it should be. Don't we all hate the "And what's the English for that??" question. I find it really strange that the Irish language version of Duolingo should be the only one that would want us to translate someone's name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1393

Because the vocative case in Irish relies on Irish spelling rules, it has long (as in centuries) been the practice to use Irish forms of traditional names (Biblical names and other traditional English names) in Irish. You have to know the Irish form of a name to do that.

De Bhaldraithe's 1959 English Irish Dictionary includes this paragraph in the Plan of the Dictionary:

Proper names are included in the body of the dictionary and not in separate lists. Personal names which have the same form in Irish and English have been omitted. It is a well-established practice to equate English and Irish personal names which have no historical relation to each other. These equations are recorded here. The problem of whether to use an Irish form or the original form of a foreign name is an extremely difficult one. The aim here has been to record Irish forms, but not to proscribe the use of the original form.

The EID has an entry for "Paul".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxOCiaragain

What is the Irish equivalent of "Max"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EK5-3-2007

i had it all in order like the english but it still said it was wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lyle_O_Nathair

Thats because Irish has a different word order than English. It's Verb-Subject-Object in Irish, not Subject-Verb-Object like in English

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