"Is dit een café, eetcafé of een restaurant?"

Translation:Is this a coffee house, an eating café or a restaurant?

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/webazos
webazos
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What is the difference between the three. My guess is: - Café , only to drink, maybe pies or desserts. - Eetcafé, to drink and some easy dishes, what French call petit-restauration: sandwich, omelette, croque and so on. - Restaurant, you go there to eat.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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That's it indeed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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In England a café is somewhere serving food (= eetcafé). If they only serve coffee, it would be a coffee bar.

So my translation would be "Is this a coffee bar, café or a restaurant".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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I certainly agree that in England, a café would always serve food of some kind - even if it's only "light bites". So: "eating café" is a tautology, as they would never serve drinks only. I also don't find the term "coffee bar" at all odd or alien. If you went back 20 years, it would probably have been an uncommon term, but with a surge in the overpriced things on every high street, it's no longer a linguistic oddity. I do understand, however, Susande's point that "coffee bar" (whether or not you accept it's part of normal English usage) is not an accurate translation of Dutch: "café".

I seem to recall that in the Netherlands, there are other subtle distinctions between the different types of establishment, based on substances you may or may not be able to buy there, that aren't food and drink!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NedChamber
NedChamber
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I'm from London and have lived in Nottingham for a good while and have never, ever heard the term 'coffee bar' used. Sounds posh to my ears. To me and most people I know, any place that serves coffee and maybe light snacks or meals is called a cafe (without an accent on the 'e'). I'm intrigued, in what part of the country do people say 'coffee bar'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seannami
seannami
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Coffee bar sounds like one of those little cart barristas you see at stations (I'm in Australia). If cafe means 'pub' in Dutch, perhaps 'bistro' is a good option? Non-food coffee places here are pretty much called coffee places, but an 'eating cafe' sounds a bit odd. I don't think we generally make a distinction if they aren't alcohol licensed (those we have MANY names for ;))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GonzaIillo
GonzaIillo
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One particular detail is that in some "Cafés", coffee is not very popular and everyone is drinking beer instead. I had a hard time once in a small city in North-Holland to get a "koffie verkeerd" (milky coffee, café au lait)... they looked at me as if I had ordered the most exotic drink. In the end they served me an americano and brought me a milk box that they found somewhere in the kitchen, so I could prepare myself my original potion.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineStinson
PaulineStinson
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The standard meaning of a "café" in the Netherlands is a bar. Usually people drink alcoholic beverages, during the daytime you can also drink coffee/tea/hot chocolate. In terms of food, cafés typically serve portions of cheese and cold (liver/raw beef/cooked) sausage and other "borrelhapjes". If a bar prepares (simple) meals as well, it's called an "eetcafé". A place where they serve no alcohol, but coffee, tea and sweets/lunch usually gets an English name, like lunchroom, coffee corner, coffee bar or a fancy name like "koffie boutique". I guess and hope that most people are aware that in the NL, a "coffeeshop" refers to a place where they sell weed..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/exception2
exception2
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Why are the articles used in such a strange way? Two articles for three words, is there a reason or doesn't it make a difference? (forgive me, not an article-using-language native speaker here:) )

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seannami
seannami
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In English, using "a" for restaurant in this case makes it sound like the place can be one of those three things, so you would answer one of the three. Without it, it is asking if it is any of those things, or something else (such as on a business registration form), and so it is a yes/no answer. It might be the same in Dutch?

3 years ago
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