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"Nosotros esperamos que haya una decisión mañana."

Translation:We hope there will be a decision tomorrow.

5 years ago

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Greenweech

When did we do the subjunctive?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phillinj
phillinj
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We didn't yet

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

green:;Looks like we are starting now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Well, we're sort of starting it. My English grammar is pretty weak, but I don't think "there will be" is the subjunctive. I think it's "that there be" ( but it doesn't like that).

I haven't seen this "habrá" form of the future either. I've only see the "ir infinitive" form.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobtackett

From Spanish class, this sentence structure does fit for the use of the subjuntive tense. When you begin a sentence with "I think that" or I hope that*" or similar beginnings, it triggers the subjunctive tense. When the first clause is a matter of opinion or a hope, or is otherwise not known for certain, and followed by "que", it triggers the subjunctive tense in the second clause. At least that's how I remember the lessons.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola bobtackett: The only clarification I would make is that "I think that..." does not trigger subjunctive -- because if you "think that", there is no doubt implied. If you say, "I don't think that...", then it would trigger subjunctive. CHAU Feliz Días de Fiesta.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leitchie
leitchie
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If it involves the head and then generally you continue with the present tense - yo pienso que lo haces bien...yo veo que escuchas...yo oigo que cantas....yo creo que entiendes. If it involves the heart then you should switch to the subjunctive - yo quiero que te vayas...yo deseo que vengas...me gusta que que cantes. In addition to this, if you negate a sentence that would otherwise use thr present, then you have to switch to the subjunctive - yo no pienso que lo hagas bien...yo no veo que escuches...yo no oigo que cantes...yo no creo que entiendas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobtackett

Thanks for the correction. It has been a few years ago since I took Spanish. Gracias por el saludo. Fue un buen Thanksgiving.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Russ_Eaton
Russ_Eaton
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Agreed. But vaya used by duo is clearly the subjunctive. Im not looking forward to that session...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkmichael2
mkmichael2
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I'm feeling pretty skinny in here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Barbara: Yes, in true subjunctive it would be "that there would be", but in common English I think we would say "there will be" -- or "there would be" -- or "there may be". All of these could be correct translations EMOH.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"would be" is the English conditional, not the subjunctive. (I'm guessing that "deactivated user" meant to say "in true subjunctive it would be "that there be", since they had "that they would be" in the common-English list.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianBrink

Surely the English subjunctive, which would be appropriate here, should be 'there should be', 'that there may be', or 'that there might be'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlorenceMo11
FlorenceMo11
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But it is a subjunctive clause, so my guess would be the verb will also be subjunctive. Didn't know that taking latin prose composition would help here but grammar is grammar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Yes. This is a first person or third person subjunctive mood. Spanish uses it for uncertainty or doubt (I hope, would like, it is important that). As such, the literal English translation would be:

"We hope that he/I have a decision tomorrow."

See these two sites:

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/verbs.htm (go to "mood" http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/conditional.htm

In English, the subjunctive uses "the base form" of the verb (base form is the infinitive without the "to" ) (i.e., "have") for present tense, and "were" for past tense.

Also, in English, sometimes a conditional uses the subjunctive: "If my brother were the boss, I wouldn't have a job today. . " In this type, the subjunctive (were) is in the "if" portion of the conditional.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackstewart2

haya is the subjunctive of haber.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelHorowi
JoelHorowi
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It's a badly designed tree with almost no grammar notes, you just have to look things up on other sites.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It is a well-designed tree with almost no grammar notes so we have to look elsewhere if we want to learn. Just consider Duolingo as a set of prompts that give us an idea what we are looking for.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vito731420

According to this book (which one could buy on Amazon): "Spanish verbs and essentials of grammar" by Ina W. Ramboz p.58, the translation of DL is not correct. Subjunctive of impersonal HABER: "HAYA" translates as: "THERE MAY BE". So, it should be: "We expect that THERE MAY BE a decision tomorrow.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"We hope that there is a decision tomorrow"was ACCEPTED. There's a great Frank and Ernest cartoon: "Hey, I hear that you invented the subjunctive." "No, but I sure wish I had!" (one caveman to another)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neogerot
neogerot
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Can't we say it like this.."we hope that tomorrow there will be a decision"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I agree that it should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cookj

According to the Duolingo answer above, "haya" = there will be. However, in their definition, they show it as "have".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trenty70
trenty70
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Haya is a subjunctive conjugation of haber - to have. This means that obviously Duolingo will list it as "(...) have/has". However notice how the sentence uses the word "mañana" indicating tomorrow, this would give an indication about the meaning of "haya" in this context, which is in the future "there WILL be"...... Whereas "espero que haya suficiente comida" means "I hope that there IS enough food". Notice how this sentence is talking about present tense, while the one above talks about tomorrow's events. This is how the meaning of "haya" can change. Hope I explained it well enough!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola trenty70: Thank you for your explanation. But, to clarify, "haya" is the present subjunctive of "hay" which means " there is" or "there are". The meaning of "haya" doesn't really change. Duolingo shows one of a possibility of several translations. "Haya" could mean "there would be", "there will be", "there is", "there may be", depending on context (which is what you also were alluding to). "Haya", yes, has its root in "haber", but it is not really a conjugation of "haber", it is sort of a separate verb form all by itself. Que le vaya bien.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leitchie
leitchie
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Generally the subjunctive expresses doubt, hypothesis, future events, etc. and must be used with verbs of the heart. In English this could be translated several ways "I hope that tomorrow there is enough food", " I hope that tomorrow there will be enough food", "I hope that tomorrow ther may/might/should be enough food". All are roughly equivalent. In the example, regardless of the doubt involved about the amount of food available tomorrow or whether the event is in the future or hypothetical, the subjunctive " haya" is required because the heart verb invokes it "espero que..." It's never correct to say "Espero que hay...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeannineRN

"deactivated user's" fact that "Hay" is a verb all unto itself is the best explanation yet. Jueveshuevos 'splains this, also, but Spanishdict.com doesn't have "haya". Gotta get my verb book out of the car 9/2014

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Spanishdict.com does have haya. In the second part of the definition, it says "See also haber". If you click on "haber", you can then click on "conjugation" where you'll see "haya" listed several times.

I don't understand how it's a verb unto itself. It's just the subjunctive (or imperative) of haber.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeannineRN

BarbaraMorris, "haya" is not listed in the SpanishDict table of conjugations for "haber", only in some of the Spanish example sentences; i reported this to them. My 1980 Harper Collins defines "hay", as a verb meaning "there is/are" conjugated in subjunctive as "haya". It only has 7 conjugations, one for each "tense". "Haber" is an auxiliary verb meaning "to have"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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In the book by Stephen Thompson "15,000 Spanish Verbs, fully conjugated in all the tenses" I see that "haya" is the subjunctive, 1st and 3rd person singular, for "haber". "Hay" is the indicative, 3rd person singular, non-personal form for "haber". In other words Él/Ella ha, [it] hay. (No pronoun is needed because "hay" does not appear in any other tense/person/number for haber.)

However, at this website - http://www.conjugation.org/cgi-bin/conj.php - "hay" is not listed as any form of haber, although "haya" is listed as the present subjunctive. I suspect "hay" was omitted from this automated conjugator for the simple reason that the program is not able to include two different verb forms in one cell of the table.

Based on this, I think the sentence "Nosotros esperamos que haya una decisión mañana." translates literally to "We hope that there might/could/would be a decision tomorrow."

It seems common in both English and Spanish to use the present tense when referring to something in the near future - as "we leave tomorrow" or "we make that decision next week."

Both sources for Spanish conjugation show present subjective 3rd person plural as "hayan" - so it seems to me that "there are" would be "hayan" rather than "haya." Can any native Spanish speakers comment on that? Would you say "Hayan tres mujeres en la casa"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

"Haya", like all forms of "hay", is a conjugation of "haber", but it is a different sort of conjugation, since technically there is no subject. "Haber" is really only "to have" in the sense that it is usually a helping verb. "Yo he hablado" - "I have spoken".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola cookj: I quit relying on the dropdown "hints" long ago. They are not reliable. I recommend using a good Spanish/English dictionary or go to a good online translation site. CHAU

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

And that's why I translated it,"we hope to have..." which I though made perfect sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott5940

Homefire, I did the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axl.c

I am not a native speaker of English, but I had the feeling that some translation like this should be acceptable:

We hope that there be a decision tomorrow We hope that a decision be made by tomorrow

Is that correct? I didn't dare trying it, but I would be pleased to have some feedback from a native speaker.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I think we should always dare to try. Losing a heart isn't as important as losing a tiny bit of knowledge.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"We hope that a decision be made by tomorrow" is both correct and natural-sounding English. But it sounds extremely formal. And adding "by" changes the meaning from the Spanish sentence since it also includes the time before tomorrow. "We hope that a decision be made tomorrow" is closer to the Spanish sentence.

"We hope that there be a decision tomorrow" doesn't sound natural to me, but I think it is correct, although the subjunctive is used so little in English now that my ear is not accustomed to it in all the valid ways it can be used.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KalmanKovari

Subjunctive "that there be" is unusual, though it is still correct. I dared to use it... One heart less, one report more. Fair deal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Russ_Eaton
Russ_Eaton
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I agree; less common but correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I believe that the correct English literal subjunctive would be:

"I hope there might be a decision," or "I would hope that a decision is made" "I hope that a decision be made." (Also see territech above.)

"Haya" is present subjunctive, not future. I guess that in this instance, DL is being less literal.

BTW, although I haven't checked this out, I don't believe this is a conditional. A conditional is an "if on this condition...Then..." form

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronanlyne

As Barbara said, I think it's technically correct English, but it sounds strange to my ears, because most people don't say it that way (we're not so good at the subjunctive in English).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zeunysos

axl.c,

English doesn't typically use the subjunctive in clauses governed by verbs like "hope", "believe", "think", etc.

I suspect this is because such verbs already imply uncertainty. If I say "I hope this will happen", I'm obviously not asserting that it will definitely happen, so there's no real need to mark the fact that "will" is not actually indicative here. By the same token, we tend not to bother with the subjunctive when using the future tense in general (past tense is stricter: "I hoped this would happen" not "I hoped this will happen").

We can use a modal subjunctive with these 'thinking' verbs if we're trying to call attention to the uncertainty: "I suspect this may be because...", "would be", "could be". But not the true subjunctive: "I suspect this to be because..." is stilted, appropriate for an academic treatise; "I suspect this is because..." is more natural.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leitchie
leitchie
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Spanish doesn't use the subjunctive with to believe or to think either usually.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mirek.hanak

I ventured : We hope to have a decision tomorrow. Not accepted. Let's go back to rigid translations......

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heqamaat
heqamaat
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Is using wait instead of hope as the translation of esperar wrong in this case?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leitchie
leitchie
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Yes, in this case. Although it might depend on the context. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliciaRain

I used "wait" also, but it wanted "expect".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AGoldstein221

I believe this is wrong. Haya is the present subjunctive. Hubiere is the future subjunctive, which I think should be used instead: http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/haber

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adder3
adder3
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This is in at the deep end to me

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manosdefie
manosdefie
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So, why is the present subjunctive used in this sentence and not the future?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snunamak

good question. And if it is present, why haya and hayamos since it's "we"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

"Haya" is not referring to "nosotros," it's referring to "a decision tomorrow"

We hope that there will be a decision tomorrow.

Esperemos is present tense "we hope"

For the immediate future, the present tense is much more commonly used than the future tense. The future tenses are not used as much in Spanish

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leitchie
leitchie
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Because when you use "to hope" in Spanish the second part of the clause has to be in the subjunctive. "To hope" involves emotion, therefore the subjuctive is required. Also, there is doubt about the result or the possibility of achieving a result, in the future, so again this requires the subjunctive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GigiGottwald
GigiGottwald
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Why can't it mean "... that you will have a decision ..."? Addressing someone in the polite form?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

haya = hay in the present tense - it is the verb that means "there is/there are"

That there will be = haya.

That you will HAVE a decision would use "tener" - to have.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeannineRN

jueveshuevos, what's the difference between haya and habrá? 9/2014

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leitchie
leitchie
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Haya is the present subjunctive of haber - espero que haya lluvia mañana / I hope that it might rain tomorrow. Habrá is the future of haber - habrá lluvia mañana / there will be rain tomorrow.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GigiGottwald
GigiGottwald
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Gracias, JuevesHuevos! Now I understand.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sabio_mucho
sabio_mucho
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"We hope that there may be a decision tomorrow." This should be accepted. In English, the subjunctive tense has limited use and is largely supplanted by the modal auxiliaries, like "may" and "might". English speakers don't use this form much, in part perhaps because one sounds so indecisive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leitchie
leitchie
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You're translation is 100% correct. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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May I add to your explanation, sabio_mucho? You may have noticed that scientists use "may" and "might" and such indecisive terms almost all the time because every "fact" has some level of uncertainty; (and that is a fact, within certain well-defined parameters, and allowing for precisely calculated errors of precision and accuracy, and subject to revision and refinement in the future in light of additional data and improved analytical techniques ... maybe!).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juanitawhite

I am studying here in a Mexico, where the imperative is used with "desire" as well as orders and begging. And haya is third person singular of haber in the Imperative tense, ALSO!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bonifaciu
Bonifaciu
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We hope to have a decision tomorrow. ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rabidlemur
rabidlemur
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Have would be tener, this is the auxillary verb haber, in this case it mimics more of a to be than to have.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djusen
djusen
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Esperamos que haya las notas para las lecciónes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bamburm

it should be either "we hope there will be a decision...." or "we expect a decision..." missing out the second verb completely. Using the present tense "there is " with "tomorrow" is not grammatically correct in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Colette984040

'We hope that there will be a decision tomorrow' would sound more correct to Irish ears!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Colette984040

'I hope that there will be a decision tomorrow' is correct English translation

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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No. Whatever arguments there may be about this sentence, "nosotros esperamos" will always be "We hope".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MayrinMora1

i only got this wrong because i didnt know how to spell decision and tomarrow but arent we just trying to learn spanish no english

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laraik
Laraik
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What is haya

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJP22
CJP22
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I think my answer was correct

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJP22
CJP22
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I think "we hope to have" is a pretty good translation!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScotRobert1

We hope " there is" rather than "will be".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gz7g6b

I dont see 'be' in this sentence

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoachimB

When is "haya" used and when is "hay" used?

2 months ago