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https://www.duolingo.com/eufinlayson

Parentheticals in translations

Sorry if this is covered elsewhere but I couldn't find an answer.

When translating, if there is a parenthetical that is written in Spanish because the original was written in English should it be translated into English? It seems to me that is should be dropped but that this violates the guidelines that you shouldn't leave things out.

For example: "I have a dog" (tengo un perro) would you translate it "I have a dog" (I have a dog) or just "I have a dog"

Thanks.

3 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Personally I just omit them, as it makes little sense to leave them in - to me at least. It's something that typically happens when translating an article about a book or a film to English, where the original English title is added in parentheses.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan-NYC
Dan-NYC
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I would leave it out, but someone might add it in just to get a few XP's.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eufinlayson

Thank you for your kind responses.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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I omit it with a comment explaining why, so people don't think I skipped it by mistake. Usually something like "Since 'xyz' is originally in English and this article is being translated into English, there's no reason to include the [other language] translation or to translate it back into English here".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lahure
Lahure
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I would suggest that there is no difference between the various uses of parentheses on Duo. The phrase can be enclosed within ( ), ' ' ," " or even just - I have -.

3 years ago