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  5. "Vi sjunger."

"Vi sjunger."

Translation:We sing.

January 25, 2015

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katt64

Here's how I think the sound is pronounced in my opinion. From what I hear/see many people pronounce words with "sj" sound, the sound seems to exhibits three properties: 1. the sound of /x/ (with a little less frication) 2. the sound of /ʃ/ (also with a little less frication) 3. the sound and especially look of /f/ (with less frication than normal).

3 sounds at the same time. So, make your tongue like you are pronouncing an /x/ then bend the tip like you are pronouncing a /ʃ/, then curl your lower lip inward only very slightly.

If needs be, you may need to exhale a little harder to pronounce this sound to compensate for the loss of force of air due to the 3 articulation points. And less frication is needed at teach articulation points so that the loss of force of air is not too much.

Also, don't forget to round your lips.

If I am wrong do tell me, I have been pronouncing it this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaiah240933

any chance you could give that in terms for some one who doesn't know ipa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

The videos by Academia Cervenia here might be helpful: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUb87YTKOTgnGcAM4toC-6A


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewsSuzy

Brilliant description - can you do that for all languages please ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingoLaura

'sj' makes a 'h' sound?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

Not quite. It’s unique to Swedish and it’s usually called the sj-sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nvirjskly

Is it similar to rounding the tip of the tongue up whilst making a /x/ sound?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

Try making a /x/ sound, then round your lips and direct the airflow to the lips and you should come pretty close.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoyunmyoun

Would it be the same thing for "sk-" sound in 'skära'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fruit21Orn

really helpful tack


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yibemajam

I find it very difficult to pronounce. I have tried your tip but still no dice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raconteur

keep trying. only reason you can't pronounce is that the muscles needed in the tongue and mouth for pronouncing the sound aren't strong enough yet, because they have never been used that way. when you keep trying, muscle gets stronger, and you will realize you can pronounce it now whereas no sound would come before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

Brilliant! My mother's family name is Sjoholm - Sj !!!! I know this sound !!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berniebud

Almost. It's more of a hard "H" with your lips rounded.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel_Ros

Do anybody know theres a proper website to know how to pronounce these alphabets? i speak norwegian and danish, i just want to know swedish ?( please do not ask me to buy a book) , i have swedish /danish dictionary but i prefer to have something like have Kenyon and Knott . i will be really appreciate it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SashaHartl

I have been copying exactly what I hear on this example in Stockholm. I got laughed at. I am not sure how to say this now. :( I will try the suggestions below and see how it works out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ack_bel

Does the present form of verbs in swedish always end in "R"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElBearo

My question is why do sj and sk make the same sound?

Wouldn't that mean I could spell this as skunger?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

No, sk is pronounced sh only before a soft vowel


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slogger

Awhile back someone posted on Duo a link to this video and its two followups on the right. I haven't listened to them yet, and, besides, my opinion isn't worth much, as I'm not a native speaker.

katt64's description sounds pretty much like what I heard as a child from my grandparents, who were both native speakers (on my father's side, one from Göteborg and the other from an island off the east coast). In English,, FWIW, for Swedish names the SJ spelling is generally pronounced as "sh."

If any native speakers care to comment on the pronunciation given in the first two "tapes" and the pronunciation in general of this material, I'd be delighted and grateful to hear. For now it is what I'm going by, w/ help from some books and listening on YouTube. Of course, w/ Duo's recent "non-communication" setup, I may not see any such comments for quite some time, but I'll look back here every so often.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plentbeest

Does the 'sj' in sjunger have a similar sound as the 'ch' in dich in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaiah240933

It’s sounds more like ur trying to whistle but without the actual whistle. Another comparison is the sound “phew” in English like when something almost went horrible. I recommend a few YouTube videos about this sound to help you understand it better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R.Dysangelium

I would like to answer you because I've found a really interesting video and I think it'll help you.

well, I don't think "sj" sounds like "ch" in Dich. "sj" in "sjunger" sounds like "juan" in Spanish according to Katrin Berndt. https://youtu.be/_vjUSm9GUu8

ps: English is not my mother tongue (I speak Portuguese)... so I'm trying to improve my English skills. Feel free to correct me. =*


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plentbeest

Very helpful indeed! Tack så mycket.

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