"Dieser Berg ist höher als dein Haus."

Translation:This mountain is higher than your house.

August 3, 2013

35 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Selbstverständlich


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mludlam

great response, this is my new favourite German word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

It has always been one of my favorite words to. I learned it from context in Germany, though, and still have to think twice to translate it. I learned a lot of German from breaking down their compound words. It made learning easier, but translation somehow more difficult.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dj9607

What are the components of this word? I know it means of course


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Selbst means self and verständlich is related to the verb verstanden and means understandable or intelligible. In other words it's understandable in and of itself. This word itself was selbstverständlich without me ever having to look for the appropriate English translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serdna29

Does this mean that all cities that have -berg in their names make a reference to a mountain? So cities like Nürnberg would translate to something like the mountain of Nürn? Or is this completely off...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenMH

Mark Zuckerberg...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaronheiss

Whose name means "sugar mountain". Yup.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

The name »Nürnberg« comes from Old High German »nuorenberc«, meaning “rocky mountain”.

However, a modern folk etymology derives the name from »nur ein Berg« “only one mountain”, because the mountain on which the fortress is built (known today as »Ölberg«) is the only one in the area.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

I believe it's true.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hiccup

Is Berg also a hill? If not, what is a hill auf deutsch? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

A hill is der Hügel in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darinr6b.de96aze

How can one tell if dieser means "this" or "that"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaronheiss

"Dieser" means "this" in the vast majority of cases. If it's ever used to mean "that", it should be really obvious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petorialc

Shouldn't it be "taller"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

That would be »größer«.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas386314

Why dieser not diese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SushilKakk1

Berg is masculine, so dies is declined to dieser (nominative masculine) just like other der words- all, jed, jen, solch, welch, manch etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AzodnemNauj

Breaking News, the water is wett


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WhiskeyFlames

Does this mean the mountain is larger than the house, or the mountain is in a higher location?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

It means the top of the mountain is at a higher elevation than the top of the house, which could be for either reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim365236

I'd be shocked to find a house that's taller than a mountain, since a mountain generally has to be at least 600 meters tall.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

That definition was devised by the British and the US later followed suit. But both dropped it back in the 70s. They made a whole movie about it.

https://www.thoughtco.com/difference-between-hill-and-mountain-4071583


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amartya1511

Here your house is in accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

No, it's nominative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Romulo1972

Does the "B" in the word Berg sounds like a "V" ? At least that's waht I heard, maybe my ears are deceiving me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

The b in the German noun Berg sounds just like the b in the English iceberg – not the rest of it, though. Duolingo's sentence sounds fine to me in that regard. You can listen to some examples of the word spoken by humans at forvo: http://www.forvo.com/word/berg/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paukke

Just to be clear... Can the word "Berg" be also used for a hill that's NOT "höher als dein Haus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Say you're the owner of a »Hochhaus« “skyscraper” …

Or say »dieser Berg« is Villingili in the Maldives, or a toy mountain in a train set …


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imperson8

You'd kinda expect that, wouldn't you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

That's exactly what makes it a good example to teach a comparison of inequality.

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