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"They want me to be a father."

Translation:Ellos quieren que yo sea padre.

3 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dosadnizub
dosadnizub
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Why not "ellos me quieren que sea un padre" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

The literal translation of "Ellos quieren que yo sea un padre" is "They want that (que) I be a father." Spanish takes the English direct object pronoun "me," which is in objective case, and translates it as the subject case pronoun "I." That way, the word "que" (that), which introduces the second subjunctive clause, acts like an English subordinating conjunction. In modern generative grammar, I believe a conjunction is termed "connector" in both languages). For more about subordinating conjunctions, see: https://www.thoughtco.com/subordinating-conjunction-1692154

One of the hallmarks of this type of Spanish subjunctive is that both clauses must have a subject and a predicate. Spanish syntax rules demand that both clauses be what English rules define as "independent clauses." If I am correct–and please, somebody correct me if I'm wrong–Spanish grammar does not differentiate between independent clauses and dependent clauses. Rather, the "que" that is used after a verb of desire is rather like the "ifwere" construction that signifies the English subjunctive.

So to answer your question, the "me" in "Ellos me quieren que sea un padre" is redundant.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rollermama

I wondered the same thing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

See my response above.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

BECAUSE THIS ISN'T ENGLISH

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerZorz
DerZorz
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BUENA SUERTE AMIGO

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

This sentence is an example of how a bad hint can get stuck in my mind when I'm tired and stay there and get repeated over and over....and need to be relearned.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sockeye47

The Big Fish had this problem with his parents, before we ever met. He finally stopped it by informing his mother that he could become a father as quickly as she wanted, but he'd always assumed she'd rather he'd be married first. She never brought it up again.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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DL told me that a correct response was "Quieren que sea un padre" I cannot see the yo in that sentence. Would it be understood?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nick.ayala

(yo) sea

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You wish to be?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Yes, but what I would like to know is is "sea" is first person singular subjunctive only.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/plbray

According to 'Google Translate', without the 'yo' the sentence would read "They want to be a father." I'm confused.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonBastian
JonBastian
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Never trust Google translate. It gets very confused in languages where you can leave out the pronouns and results in those cases are not accurate. Generally, you don't really need pronouns in Spanish if the verbs make it clear who's doing what, wanting what, and for whom.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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Me too, and no one is answering!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

The subjunctive in Spanish encompasses more than just the "If I be ... (present tense)/if I were ... (past tense) structure that is the main way that English uses the subjunctive. See my answers above for why each predicate verb in a Spanish subjunctive sentence must have its own subject. Following is the literal translation without the "yo": QUIEREN (They want) QUE (that) SEA UN PADRE (to be a father). I'm not a native speaker or expert, but I believe this sentence would sound odd to a native Spanish speaker because the subject, ellos, is plural while "un padre" is singular. This indicates to me that "they" all want to be a part/members of some sort of collective. I would be interested to hear what a native Spanish speaker thinks about this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrynaC

Ok, maybe I'm just crazy. But why is this 'sea' instead of 'fuere'? Fatherhood is not something that typically happens instantaneously, so 'being a father' is presumably a desire for the future. Unless the sentence is actually supposed to indicate a regret, rather than a wish, lol. But if that were the case, would we even use the subjunctive?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I agree with DerZorz that perhaps the person in question is already a father, and people are telling him to act like one instead of acting like a child himself.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerZorz
DerZorz
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Look, the thing is that the verb "to be" here has a meaning beyond the naturally biological fatherhood status, it goes deep through the social boundaries of the assumption of being a father of a child. The necessary duties that imperate the parenting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beeohdee

Is "Me quieren ser padre" wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muddogging1
Muddogging1Plus
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Run.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tevv_Frost

why does everyone seem like an English nerd?!?!? i don't know what in the living heck subjuntive or conjugation or whatever means

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

This is because you pick it up as you go along and read on the web at various sites about the rules for each tense. Unless Duo has some writings on it. It really is hard at first for me not having grammer even in English for decades and learning to use the subjunctive because my relatives used formal speech at dinner an it sounded natural and pretty to me... so it never felt stilted in that context. For some nice people, it is stilted. for some nice folks it is not anything but normal and often gentle (as in kind( talk with rules and boundaries and that sort of "gentleman/gentlewoman" courtesy attached. Situational. Not always do those people alluse it in all circumstances. Some do tho. to avoid any perceived discourtesy to anyone ever. The irony is some people then feel this is speaking down to them if the tone is wrong. It's all about the tone maybe.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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Could also mean: They want me to be a priest (sacerdote) - a bit more common in Spanish than English.

3 months ago