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  5. "Drengen har kagen."

"Drengen har kagen."

Translation:The boy has the cake.

January 26, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanNader

Danes call everything cake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ycUvuSap

Yeah, kakku, täytekakku, kuivakakku, piirakka, leivos, even keksi (småkage).

If it is sweet and baked, it is en kage på dansk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imnotnice

This might be a stupid question but why is the "the cake" instead of just "cake"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ainhoa461032

Cake is kage and the cake is kagen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ra.mrn

Maybe it's referring to a specific cake (for example, a birthday one?). The boy has the (a certain) cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CScubing

Is the -en sound at the end of drengen and kagen meant to be almost completely inaudible at the end of the word? Could a more experienced Danish speaker please explain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

Native speakers saying "drengen": http://forvo.com/word/drengen/#da
Native speaker saying "kagen": http://forvo.com/word/kagen/#da


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CScubing

Thank you this helped clear up a lot. the -en at the end of words such as drengen and kagen are meant to be audible. Duolingo should get this fixed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily815834

Haha I'm not an experienced Danish speaker, but I recommend you to just mock what you hear, I'm sure it's correct. And even if you say it a bit wrong, it won't matter, because you'll probably be understood from the context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianeEsbec1

There are other things that are sweet and baked besides cake. Kringle for example, and puff pastry.

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