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"Los minutos de la hora"

Translation:The minutes of the hour

0
5 years ago

119 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JonnyKlase

Why does there need to be a the in the front?

58
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sahilsingla112

Exactly ! unless we need to refer to some "special" minutes. For example minutes of the meeting. Otherwise it should say minutes of the hour

34
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irdevonk

There needs to be an article in front of Spanish nouns, except under certain circumstances, doesn't there?

Also "minutes of a meeting" would actually be the transcribed record of the speech that happened during the meeting ;)

7
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KamilaWitu

The->los

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonnyKlase

I know how to say the but I don't know why you need to say it here.

16
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simoneallout

Its just how they talk. Plus you dont have to say the.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NitroNito

Yeah, but notice how when they refer to weeks, months, or days, they use "los" but you are not supposed to actually use the word "the". It was kind of implied that in relation to time, "los" does not literally translate to "the"

13
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

nitronito- you're talking about days but here it's about minutes, ans a noun most of the time needs the article

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SummerHerr

Its not rlly necesary its just for learning purposes. In soanish you always have a los or de or a whatever like in envlish we just say the nouns and dont give any descriptions bjt with spanish theres mkre detail while also being less conplicated

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/akumria

Why shouldn't this be "Los minuos del hora"?

15
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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"hora" is feminine. "del" is the mandatory contraction of "de + el". "el" is usually used with masculine nouns.

112
Reply55 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scotty13d

Nice! This answer inspired me to keep a word document to track useful explanations. That helped! Keep it up.

19
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anannlind
anannlind
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Thank you for this explanation! :)

3
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnikaHansen

Thanks, I was wondering this.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gatito_muchacho

As rocko said, "del" is the contract of "de" and "el", so it is strictly masculine, and so "de la" is strictly feminine. The word "al" follows these same principles, too! "Al" = "a" + "el" ('to the' in English) and is masculine, and the phrase "a la" is used in place when a feminine form is needed. Just thought I'd share that, as it blew my mind... :D

13
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AtaraxianSpa

While there are a great number of contractions in English, in Spanish there are only two. Two !!! Al & del. "al" is the contraction of "a el" (not "a él"), and is always used when encountered if it doesn't meet one of the few exceptions to the rule. "del" is the contraction of "de el" (not "de él") and is also obligatory, provisionally.

Exceptions: http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/11

5
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YuengerA

Never heard of it before, but I believe you.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SirSwick

Sometimes when she says "de la" it sounds like "del a", is there any way or rule to decipher this?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/unpuntodevista

"Del" would tend to mean "of the" and adding an article "a" which means "to" after it simply doesn't make sense, "Del" is always followed by a noun.

16
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

“Del a" is not something you'll encounter, unless “A" is the name of something. It doesn't make any sense otherwise, so you shouldn't have a struggle trying to decide which is being said. You'll probably never encounter “del a", but you'll frequently hear “de la".

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulHake1

Delacet

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skyskylar

I put, "The hours' minutes" and it still didn't accept it. I mean, The minutes OF THE hour would mean the hours' minutes.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MollieMarissa

Hmm... I've never heard of time being possessed by larger chunks of the time. Months of the year, but never the year's months. Days of the week, but not the week's days. I'm not sure "of the" is a possessive term here.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

marissa- the is never possessive but a definite article.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nealbo

"Of the" can be possessive in Spanish:

El perro de la niña = The girl's dog (Literally, the dog of the girl).

So I think this is why Skyskylar is getting confused, because normally in this situation we wouldn't translate literally but apparently when discussing time, we do translate literally.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

nealbo- But I think that in grammar the is never possessive. What makes the possessive in this sentence isn't THE but, the apostrophe after girl

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nealbo

The "of the" can be thought of as "belonging to".

1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

skyskylar- La hora is singular so you have to put hour singular too. To put the possessive for singular, the apostrophe comes after the word and before the S : the hour's minutes. When the noun is plural, like hours, you put the s after the word and then the apostrophe : the hours' minutes.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

If you gave me a down vote for my last sentence, about the plural in words finishing by S, take a look in your grammar and the apostrophe goes after the S, not for singular but for plural.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bryankeith2

@Skyskylar- you could be right. However, The answer would be 'the HOUR's minutes' = los minutos de LA hora.= minutes of the (single) hour. "HOUR'S" is a singular possesive. As in, belonging to one hour.

" HOURS' " is plural AND possessive. Which is probably why DL doesn't accept it. E.g. : los minutos de las horas = the minutes of (multiple) hours = The hours' minutes.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottKingUK

All minutes are the same? Mind = Blown.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeff_forssell

I tried "The hours minutes" but that wasn't accepted.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Why would anyone ever say, The minutes of the hour? What is that supposed to mean?

18
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

I was thinking this sentence could work as a poem's title but can't think of any other use for it.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AtaraxianSpa

If you look closer, there is no period at the end. This is a sentence fragment, a noun phrase in particular. This phrase would serve as the subject or object of a complete sentence. A bit more info on noun phrases: http://grammar.about.com/od/mo/g/nounphraseterm.htm And a link for those interested in dusting off their English grammar in general: http://grammar.about.com/od/basicsentencegrammar/a/basicstructures.htm

4
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

You are one hundred percent right.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KVenable1

Minutes in an hour maybe...?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MTAllenby
MTAllenbyPlus
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That's what I put. It seemed better English to me.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carterschrum

the text says de la which means of the, in an translates to en un which was not what the text said. and these are both literall translations not approximations so you couldn't bend the meanings to get the answer of in an without it being incorrect on duo lingo.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shaquira18

same with me. "the month's weeks" was accepted before. should work here as well with "the hour's minutes".

2
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilush0_0

I tried 'The hour's minutes' too, why wasn't it accepted?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TolnaiPaul

me too

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KleanKlynes

Mine was

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/petowner44

"De" means "of" or "from". You basically just left the word out of your translation.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AzackB

why isn't it "del hora"

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

azack- hora is feminine, so de la hora. del is followed by a masculine noun

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ColinFinney

using the in front of minutes is talking about the minutes of each hour y'all are just reading it wrong read it carefully next time

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex_Gre

I heard the "Los minutos del ahora" . lol

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darrencraig2001

I just got clues from the word structure and got it right!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelAbad1

Esta bien tanto "The minutes of the hour" y tambien "The hour's minutes"

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tigroz

is using "del" the same as using "de la" ?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KylerPralle

Mi papá tiene 40 años: My father is 40 years old. Mi papa tiene 40 anos: my potato has 40 anuses. This is why accents are important.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronGrid

How many minutrs in an hour?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaya563853

I did in instead of of and it worked

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeffcoghill

sounds like .. en la hora ... to me

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esbelto_hombre

I keep putting minutes of the hour instead of The minutes of the hour

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BornSinner1

I wrote minutes of hour. I thought we don't need the before time/day?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

For days, it depends on what is being said. You usually just need the name of the day. Measurements of time in English almost always need another word: an, one, the, which, etc. “One minute" “An hour"

Monday is the name of a specific day, so you don't need “the" unless say something like “the first Monday of the month" or “the Monday morning rush" Hours, months, minutes are general. You need to specify which or how many. Minutes of hour just makes no sense in English.

3
Reply4 years ago