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"Ik wil je om een gunst vragen."

Translation:I want to ask you a favor.

0
3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
jamesjiao
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How would you say "I want you to ask for a favour."? (i.e., I give you instruction to get favour from someone else)

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Voorlindsay

"Ik wil dat je om een gunst vraagt"

16
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yipivan
yipivan
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What is the "om" for?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahmed.47.
ahmed.47.
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yes ! .... what if we would say that sentence without " om " ?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Verbs.au11

vragen is one of those annoying om te verbs :(

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kogi123

But there is another sentence in this same lesson: "Hij wil ons een grote gunst vragen" This time without "om". So how is it? Is "om" needed or not?

1
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NienkeFleur

It used similar to "for" "I want to ask you for a favour", in English that "for" may be dropped, in Dutch it would sound odd.

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Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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"I like to ask you a favor" is a more commenly used translation i think and should not be counted wrong.

-19
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
jamesjiao
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That sounds a bit strange to me. I would usually say ''I would like to ask you for a favour". I like to... makes it sound like it's your hobby to ask people for favours.

16
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlastairHaigh

That sentence implies that you like to ask someone a favour generally, not a specific favour; it sounds odd.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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That is correct. This sentence is quite common in he Netherlands. Usually in the next sentence the specific favour is specified. For instance: I would like to ask you a favour, could you bring me a bottle of milk when you go to the supermarket.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlastairHaigh

No, the difference is between "I like" (i.e. I enjoy) and "I would like" (i.e. I want). The sentence, in English, "I like to ask you a favour" implies that you enjoy asking favours!

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/izzysaurus

I'd say "I would like to ask you a favor" (or "can I ask you a favor") but never without the "would."

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NienkeFleur

As others have said "I would like to" would be acceptable but "I like to not", if you base it on what you've heard people say, it might be that they said "I'd like to" because "I'd" is an abbreviation of "I would"

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Reply3 weeks ago