"Um copo com água"

Translation:A glass with water

August 4, 2013

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serg07

Does it literally mean, "A glass of water" or does it translate primarily to "A glass with water"? Also, why is it "...com água" and not "...de água" ? Any help is greatly appreciated, Thank you.

August 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

"a glass with water" is the literal translation., but it means "glass of water". (there is a joke when you say "quero um copo de água" and they say "tenho só de vidro" - made of glass, not made of water)

August 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serg07

Thank you so much!

August 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FRANCISCHI4

I have the same concern can someone explain please

December 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IaraBaraleSantos

Um copo d'água is more common to use or um copo de água (it is an expression).The three examples are all correct but with different meanings. Um copo d'água is a full glass of water.Um copo com água is not a full glass but it can have whatever amount water.

November 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Somatic

it sounded like 'corpo' in the recording. :(

August 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
August 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angela.soi

So, to sum up...is it better to say com rather than de?

February 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

In fact, I usually hear "de".

February 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

That's what Marcelo Jeneci uses in the song "Copo d'água."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M73HrMqfRM4

March 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin545687

I can imagine that a native speaker understands what is meant, except if he's a joker like in your example above

January 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ragdollishh

The pronunciation of the words being said in the recording messes me up every single time. Frustrating :(

December 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FRANCISCHI4

I thought "um copo com agua" would be translated as " a glass with water" and " um copo de agua" "a glass of water"

December 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

However, "um copo de vitro" is "a cup made of glass" .was "a glass with water" not accepted as correct? Scroll up and down for more information.

August 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnubisVI

IS copo cup or glass or can it be uswd interchangeably?

June 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

"copo" is "glass" or "container to put a drink in" and "xicara" is "cup" as in a teacup or the measure of a cup. The problem comes when in English we sometimes call a glass a cup, for example a plastic cup which is larger than 8 oz. is still called a cup. In English, a small cup to drink out of might be made of glass. So "copo" can include certain kinds of "cup" as well as "glass". Another problem is that the metric system is used there and there is such a thing as a "copo Americano" which has a measure of 250ml. http://dictionary.reverso.net/portuguese-english/xicara http://dictionary.reverso.net/portuguese-english/copo

http://michaelis.uol.com.br/moderno/portugues/index.php?lingua=portugues-portugues=copo

https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copo

So the English word "cup" could refer to "xicara" or it could refer to "copo", but they are not exactly the same thing. The English word "glass" would translate as "copo". "a tea cup" or "coffee cup" would be "xicara". Now those big coffee mugs or large coffee from Starbucks would be "copo". The encyclopedia indicates that "copo" is cylindrical. I am not sure "xicara" (Brazilian Portuguese) or "chávena" ( used in Portugal) is that shape as it is a bit more open on the top from what I have seen.
https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A1vena

August 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skrats

What is the difference in sound between 'á' and 'a'? Not sure I am hearing one.

November 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb

The acute accent in "água" is used only to indicate unusual stress. In romance languages the stress is normally on the second-to-last vowel. There are some rules if it should actually fall on the last vowel in Portuguese. If these rules are not followed for a given word, the stress must be marked with an acute accent. I'm not sure if this leads to any other difference in pronunciation.

January 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhamdOmari

It shoud be ... um copo de agua . ,??

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanW379569

Why is "a cup of water" acceptable here but not "um copo de café" for "a cup of coffee?"

April 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

cup = xícara, not "copo".

April 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claudia936294

So here 'com' means with, and 'fala com' meant to talk to in another exercise. So 'com' can mean both? Also to talk with s.o.?

June 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes, "falar com" can be used for both.

June 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christina638965

It might be a joke, but this is an educational program and all through the level of English has very poor. I was not aware of the possibility of reporting. As a school teacher I would say that it is important that it is a glass of water. The jokes can be in their own chapter :)

August 6, 2019
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